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329 years later, last ‘witch’ from Salem Witch Trials is pardoned – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2022-05-27 15:32:00 –

It took more than three centuries, but the last Salem, the “witch” of Massachusetts, was not officially forgiven. Johnson, who was sentenced to death at the height of the Salem Witch Trials, was not executed, but was not officially forgiven like others who were mistakenly accused of witchcraft. The school took up her cause and investigated the legislative measures needed to reveal her name. Later, a legislation introduced by Massachusetts Democratic Senator Diana Dizorio was added to the budget and approved. Victims like Elizabeth, but at least can straighten the record, “Disorio said. He praised the youth for taking on his legislation-the long-overlooked issue of justice for this falsely convicted woman. According to the Massachusetts Bay Witch, a group dedicated to the history and folklore of 17th century witch hunting, Johnson is the last accused witch to be cleared. Hundreds of people were killed from Salem and neighboring towns during the Puritan injustice frenzy that began in 1692, struck by superstitions, illness and fear of strangers, and scapegoating and trivial jealousy. The person was blamed. Nineteen were hanged and one man was crushed by a rock and died. At the age of 22, Johnson was involved in the hysteria of a witch trial and was sentenced to her hanging. It never happened: Then-Gov. William Phips abandoned her punishment because the scale of the serious false charge in Salem sank. Over the next three centuries, dozens of suspects were officially dismissed, including Johnson’s own mother and the daughter of a convicted minister. In the end, it turned around, but for some reason Johnson’s name was not included in various legislative attempts to straighten her record. She was still technically standing because she wasn’t among the people whose convictions were officially set aside. Unlike others who were unfairly accused, Johnson had no children, so she had no descendants to act on his behalf. She “has come a long way from the horror of the witch trial, but finds that women today still challenge their rights and dispel their concerns.”

It took more than three centuries, but the last Salem, the “witch” of Massachusetts, was officially pardoned.

Massachusetts lawmakers officially accused Elizabeth Johnson Jr. of Thursday, convicting her of magic in 1693 and revealing her name 329 years after being sentenced to death at the height of the Salem Witch Trials. ..

Johnson was never executed, but like others who were mistakenly accused of magic, she was not officially pardoned.

Parliamentarians revisit her case last year after a curious second-year civilian class at North Andover Middle School took up her cause and investigated the legislative steps needed to reveal her name. I agreed.

Subsequent legislation introduced by State Senator Diana Disorio, a Democrat of Meshuen, was added to and approved by the budget.

“We can never change what happened to a victim like Elizabeth, but at least we can correct the record,” Disorio said.

In a statement, North Andover teacher Carrie Lapierre supported the legislation and undertook “a long-overlooked issue of justice for this falsely convicted woman.” Praised the youth.

“Passing this bill will greatly affect their understanding of how important it is to stand up for those who cannot defend themselves, and how strong they really are. Probably, “she said.

According to the Massachusetts Bay Witch, a group dedicated to the history and tradition of witch hunting in the 17th century, Johnson is the last witch to be accused of being cleared.

Hundreds of people were killed from Salem and neighboring towns during the Puritan injustice frenzy that began in 1692, struck by superstitions, illness and fear of strangers, and scapegoating and trivial jealousy. The person was blamed. Nineteen were hanged and one man was crushed by a rock and died.

Johnson was 22 years old when he was caught in the hysteria of a witch trial and was sentenced to hanging. It never happened: Then-Gov. William Phips abandoned her punishment because the scale of the serious false charge in Salem sank.

Over the next three centuries, dozens of suspects were officially released, including Johnson’s own mother and the daughter of a minister who was finally overturned.

However, for some reason Johnson’s name was not included in various legislative attempts to straighten the record. She was still technically standing because she wasn’t among the people whose convictions were officially set aside. Unlike others who were unfairly accused, Johnson had no children, so she had no descendants to act on his behalf.

“The story of Elizabeth and the struggle continue to resonate very much today,” Dizorio said. “Although we have come a long way from the horror of the witch trial, we find that today’s women are still challenging their rights and dispelling their concerns.”

329 years later, last ‘witch’ from Salem Witch Trials is pardoned Source link 329 years later, last ‘witch’ from Salem Witch Trials is pardoned

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