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600,000 white flags of National Mall honor lost to COVID: Coronavirus Update: NPR

A white flag stands near the Washington Monument on Tuesday. With the completion of the temporary art installation at the National Mall, over 630,000 flags are part of the artist Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg. For America: Remember, Honors the Americans who died in COVID-19.

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A white flag stands near the Washington Monument on Tuesday. With the completion of the temporary art installation at the National Mall, over 630,000 flags are part of the artist Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg. For America: Remember, Honors the Americans who died in COVID-19.

Patrick Semanski / AP

Over two weeks starting this month, over 600,000 white flags will fill the National Mall. This symbolizes the life lost to COVID-19 in the United States.

Each flag on the 20-acre lawn has a message celebrating the memories of a loved one.

Art installation, title For America: RememberCreated by Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg, a social practice artist in Washington, DC Who first created the white flag installation outside the District of Columbia RFK Stadium October 2020.

“I wanted to focus on my message. I didn’t deliberately start a large installation. My anger led me,” Firstenberg said in an interview with NPR.

The 62-year-old artist began visualizing installation ideas in March 2020 Early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic after Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick of Texas Said Americans should be willing to take the risk of the coronavirus to protect the US economy.

The message left a series of emotions in Firstenberg.

“It really bothered me. I have to do something to make a statement that someone will die for all these people and we must also cherish each of these lives. I felt it, “she said.

She uses art as a way to focus on social issues in the world

In addition to spending many years as a hospice volunteer, he has also been involved in the development of new products for Capitol Hill and pharmaceuticals. Firstenberg says she didn’t originally start as an artist.

However, after taking a series of art classes, she discovered that art was a way to focus on her message on addressing social issues.

“When I realized that I had art in myself, I took as many classes as I could,” says Firstenberg. “I wanted to use all sorts of material to make sure I had to say, so I learned all the material I could.”

Artist Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg poses in the fall of 2020 with one of the white flags set up near RFK Stadium in DC. Thousands more will be featured this month at her latest exhibition at the National Mall.

Bruce Guthrie / Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg


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Bruce Guthrie / Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg

Artist Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg poses in the fall of 2020 with one of the white flags set up near RFK Stadium in DC. Thousands more will be featured this month at her latest exhibition at the National Mall.

Bruce Guthrie / Sae Yamamoto Brennan First Emberg

In the summer of 2020, Firstenberg tried her idea.

Creating an exhibition In America: Why does this happen … Together with a team of volunteers, we planted 267,080 white flags reflecting 270,000 tombstones at Arlington National Cemetery on four acres next to RFK Stadium in First Emberg.

Just before the exhibition ended on November 30, Firstenberg was already thinking about the next project because he knew that the number of deaths from the virus would increase steadily.

“When the installation was closed last fall, we were heading into a very dark winter and were very sad to know that there would be many deaths in the future,” said Firstenberg.

Impressed by the emotional reaction after the first exhibition, she began contacting the National Park Service in hopes of bringing her project to the National Mall.

“Many of these deaths happened alone without approval.” She said. “When I had the opportunity to bring it to the National Mall, it was a huge job, but I didn’t hesitate. I knew I needed to do it.”

As the number of dead increased, so did the number of flags.

Between the first and second exhibitions of Firstenberg, nearly 400,000 people died of COVID-19 in the United States.

Over 660,000 people In the United States, COVID-19 has died and there are more than 41 million confirmed cases.

In preparation for this year’s installation, Firstenberg says it bought 630,000 white flags in June to cover the total number of lives lost by the virus.

However, after collating with the latest US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data and reconfirming the numbers, she realized that she needed to order at least 60,000 additional flags.

Created by Susanne Brennan First Emberg last year, the art installation near RFK Stadium featured a 267,080 white flag representing the incredible loss caused by COVID-19.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images


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Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Created by Susanne Brennan First Emberg last year, the art installation near RFK Stadium featured a 267,080 white flag representing the incredible loss caused by COVID-19.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

“After a few checks of the numbers, I was convinced that we didn’t use more than 630,000 flags in the first week of October,” said Firstenberg.

Unlike the installation at RFK Stadium, people leave a message or Dedicate the flag digitally If they can’t see For America: Remember Another way to connect people who have lost loved ones directly to the project.

The flag will be on display from September 17th to October 3rd.

600,000 white flags of National Mall honor lost to COVID: Coronavirus Update: NPR

Source link 600,000 white flags of National Mall honor lost to COVID: Coronavirus Update: NPR

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