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8 state propositions will be on the ballot this Election Day. Here’s what you need to know – Riverside, California

Riverside, California 2021-10-21 19:56:12 –

We analyzed what would happen if the eight proposed Texas constitutional amendments were passed.

Austin, Texas — On this election day, November 2, Texas voters will see eight state proposals on ballots.

Each is a proposed amendment Texas Constitution And, as always, voters have the opportunity to “agree” or “disagree” with each other.

All potential amendments began in the Texas State Parliament, as the State Constitution cannot be amended by citizen-led voting initiatives or petitions. For this reason, Texas will vote for the amendment in the fall of odd-numbered years, following the spring legislative session.

To help you easily understand how you want to vote for each proposed amendment, we analyzed what would happen if each ballot proposal was passed, and some of the arguments for and against each. ..

Related: November 2021 Elections: What You Need to Know Before Voting

Proposal 1 (HJR 143)

This amendment adds the Pro Rodeo Charitable Foundation, accredited by the Pro Rodeo Cowboy Association or the Women’s Pro Rodeo Association, to the list of similar foundations of other professional sports associations that are allowed to host raffles. If approved, the raffle may take place in a rodeo in Texas.

according to Texas Women’s Voter Alliance A nonpartisan organization (LWV) says the debate to get this prop through is that many other professional sports charities, including the NFL, NBA, and MLB, are already allowed to hold raffles. is. On the other hand, those who oppose the amendment say that raffle is another form of gambling, and if allowed, this form of gambling could eventually extend beyond professional sports to other types of organizations. It states that there is.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 1 appears on the ballot:

“A constitutional amendment that allows professional sports teams to carry out charitable raffles at rodeo venues by charities of organizations authorized by the Pro Rodeo Cowboy Association or the Women’s Pro Rodeo Association.”

Related: Governor Abbott sets November 2 as a special election day for constitutional amendments

Proposal 2 (HJR 99)

The Texas Constitution now congresses that the city will issue bonds or bills to pay for the development or redevelopment of transportation or infrastructure in “unproductive, underdeveloped, or devastated areas.” Allows to. The amendment adds counties to political bodies that can issue bonds or bills for that purpose and promises to increase property tax revenues to repay those bonds or bills.

However, if the county issues bonds to improve traffic, the county may allocate more than 65% of the property tax increase to repay the bonds, or use the proceeds of the bonds to build, operate, maintain, or road toll roads. It cannot be used to finance the rights of. Get.

Proponents of the amendment claim that it only allows the same licensed cities and towns that the county already has, according to the LWV. The development or redevelopment of transportation infrastructure has the potential to increase asset value. And as the state grows, such development is needed.

Opponents of the amendment say it could increase debt, which could raise local property taxes. Issuing these bonds is “binding future funds to pay debt repayments” because the state’s per capita local debt ratio is too high. And that transportation and infrastructure project may spend money that may go to other government services and projects.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 2 appears on the ballot:

“A constitutional amendment that allows the county to fund the development or redevelopment of transportation or infrastructure in unproductive, underdeveloped, or devastated areas of the county.”

Proposal 3 (SJR 27)

This amendment adds a new section to Article 1 of the Texas Constitution, the Texas Rights Code, which prohibits state or local governments from banning or limiting religious services. This proposed amendment addresses certain restrictions set during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Proponents of the amendment claim that closing the church violates religious freedom guaranteed by the US Constitution, LWV said. Opponents of the amendment say it could prevent local governments from implementing safety measures in the event of a natural disaster.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 3 appears on the ballot:

“A constitutional amendment that prohibits this state or its administrative divisions from prohibiting or limiting the religious services of religious groups.”

Proposal 4 (SJR 47)

This amendment changes the eligibility requirements for judges to run for public office.

Currently, candidates for the Supreme Court, Criminal Court of Appeals, and District Courts of Appeal must be attorneys for at least 10 years, or attorneys or judges in the Records Court for a total of 10 years. This amendment requires candidates to obtain a license in Texas for at least 10 years, defining a record court as a state court or county court established by the state legislature. In addition, the candidate’s legal license must not be revoked or suspended for 10 years.

Currently, a candidate for a state district judge must be qualified to practice law in Texas and have been a lawyer for at least four years, or a total of four years as a lawyer or judge in Texas courts. .. This amendment adds the requirement that the district judge candidate be a resident of Texas and changes the four-year requirement to eight years. Again, the candidate’s license must not be revoked or suspended during that period.

According to LWV, those in favor of passing the amendment say that increasing the experience requirements of district court judges could improve Texas’ judicial qualifications. Opponents say the additional years of experience required for the amendment could adversely affect the diversity of candidates and judges and limit the size of a candidate’s eligible pool.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 4 appears on the ballot:

“Constitutional amendment that changes the eligibility requirements of Supreme Court judges, Criminal Appeals Court judges, Appeals Court judges, and District Judges.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-2_QN5_YPk

Proposal 5 (HJR 165)

Currently, the State Commission on Judiciary Acts accepts, investigates, and takes action on complaints of allegations of illegal activity by currently in office judges. This amendment will extend its authority to judicial candidates.

According to LWV, supporters say that allowing candidates to be charged with illegal activities could lead to a fairer judicial campaign. Opponents say no amendments are needed, as anyone with tort complaints against a candidate can submit them to other authorities.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 5 appears on the ballot:

“A constitutional amendment that provides additional authority to state committees on judicial conduct regarding candidates for judicial positions.”

Proposal 6 (SJR 19)

During the COVID-19 pandemic, family members and other caregivers had restricted access to nursing homes and similar facilities. With this amendment, residents of such facilities will be able to nominate the person as their essential caregiver, and visits from that caregiver will be the resident’s constitutional right.

Proponents of this amendment point out the potential positive effects of visits on individuals in group care, according to LWV. Opponents say the amendment will reduce public health and the ability of certain government officials to restrict access to such facilities in order to protect residents and staff.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 6 appears on the ballot:

“Constitutional amendment establishing the right to appoint caregivers essential for direct visits by residents of a particular facility.”

Proposal 7 (HJR 125)

If passed, the proposal will update the Texas Constitution, allowing surviving spouses of persons with disabilities to limit property taxes on their school districts. Currently, there are restrictions on homeowners and people with disabilities over the age of 65. The proposed amendment requires that the spouse be at least 55 years old if the disabled person has died and still lives at home.

In 2019, the tax law was updated to allow this tax restriction on surviving spouses of persons with disabilities, so supporters of this amendment will verify and enforce already passed state law, according to LWV. Will clarify. Opponents say the passage could reduce tax revenues for school districts and other tax authorities and lead to further property tax exemptions that could adversely affect schools in the future.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 7 appears on the ballot:

“A constitutional amendment that allows a surviving spouse of a person with a disability to be subject to the school district ad valorem tax imposed on the spouse’s residence if he or she is 55 years of age or older at the time of his or her death.”

Proposal 8 (SJR 35)

At this time, surviving spouses of “killed in action” military personnel are entitled to property tax exemptions. If you have not remarried, you will be exempt from property tax on the market value of your spouse’s residence.

This amendment extends the same exemption to spouses of military personnel who were killed “on the job” rather than “in action.” “Working” deaths mean that their deaths were due to injuries unrelated to combat, but are still ongoing as a result of military service.

According to LWV, supporters say the amendment amends the oversight of current law and that the additional surviving spouses included in it deserve the same benefits that the already included spouses currently receive. Opponents say the amendment will kill more military personnel on the job than they really are, and lowering the value of assets will reduce tax revenues to school districts, counties, cities and special wards.

Here’s how the wording of Proposal 8 appears on the ballot:

“A constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to exempt all or part of the market value of the surviving spouse’s residence of US military members from ad valorem tax. A line of obligation.”

To learn more about the arguments for and against each proposition click here..

When can I vote for these suggestions?

Early voting for the November 2 elections will take place from Monday, October 18th to Friday, October 29th. The final application date for mail voting is Friday, October 22nd. Voting by mail must be done. If the envelope is post-marked by 7 pm on Election Day, it will be received by 7 pm on November 2nd or 5 pm on November 3rd.

The polling place on Election Day is open from 7 am to 7 pm. For early voters, voting will be held from Monday to Saturday and from noon to 6 pm on Sunday at the same time.

For the latest election coverage, please visit: KVUE.com/VoteTexas.. For election day results, please visit: KVUE.com/Elections..

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8 state propositions will be on the ballot this Election Day. Here’s what you need to know Source link 8 state propositions will be on the ballot this Election Day. Here’s what you need to know

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