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A few weeks after Hurricane Aida, tens of thousands of Luizians still don’t have the power: NPR

Hurricane Aida’s relentless wind escaped some structures when it landed as a Category 4 storm on August 29. After a few weeks, the cleanup is immeasurable and for many it is not yet powered.

Frank Morris / NPR


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Hurricane Aida’s relentless wind escaped some structures when it landed as a Category 4 storm on August 29. After a few weeks, the cleanup is immeasurable and for many it is not yet powered.

Frank Morris / NPR

Galliano, Louisiana-Hurricane Aida has reduced its net worth to near zero by robbing thousands of residents in this state of power and livelihood and destroying their homes.

In this town, you can easily see the genocide in the neighborhood while driving a car. The trailer is crushed sideways and settles down. In some parcels, there is nothing like a building, only rubble, ruined furniture, and broken glass.

Oasis in destruction

But 132 Orange’s house is an oasis on this street. For some reason, the house that Lady Lopez and Ivan Velázquez share with their children and her mother was held together. The roof was tattered, some of the siding was blown off, the windows were shattered, the doors couldn’t close, Power off Since the storm, however, it can live by current Galiano standards.

And because this trailer is relatively intact, it bursts at the seams. A neighbor whose place has been destroyed has moved. It’s two children, parents, and a sick grandmother sitting on the couch and hugging a pedestrian with fatigue. A total of 10 people are packed into this single wide trailer and there is only one bathroom.

Neighbor couple and their little daughter have moved to the children’s room

“Grandma sleeps on the couch and son sleeps in a reclining chair,” says neighbor’s mother and grandson Lopez. “We are using the other room. There is a king size bed so I am sleeping with my mother and two children. My husband puts it there every day 1 I’m using one mattress. “

The houses of Ivan Velazquez and Leydi Lopez were held almost together during the hurricane. The roof is tattered and part of the siding is damaged. But they have a generator and they are neighbors and are with them. We will repair it, so a total of 10 people.

Frank Morris / NPR


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The houses of Ivan Velazquez and Leydi Lopez were held almost together during the hurricane. The roof is tattered and part of the siding is damaged. But they have a generator and they are neighbors and are with them. We will repair it, so a total of 10 people.

Frank Morris / NPR

All children are bottled indoors because the outside world is a danger zone and they are absent from school indefinitely. Lopez has a small generator, but it runs only sporadically to save gasoline. There is no TV or work equipment. All dishes are served on the outdoor barbecue grill.

And power. They are told that it may not come here until mid-October.

The power may be off for another month

Tens of thousands of families face a similar situation.

“It’s like everything is repeated over and over again. It stressed people,” says Ivan Velazquez. It’s like a bomb, he says, pressure is rising.

Velázquez spends most of his time at work, devoting himself to repair projects for the wealthy. So he goes out to negotiate relentless traffic jams in the hurricane destruction zone caused by crew cutting trees, repairing power lines, broken stop lights and wreckage. ..

“I see accidents and bad accidents on the road almost every day.”

A few days before he saw a hit-and-run on US-90 and saw a victim dead by the side of the road.

Lopez and Velázquez are grateful to have at least their small shelter here. The location of Block Claire McGowan on the desolate lane fell from its 6-foot concrete pillar. It sags sideways, is dark, damp and unstable.McGowan and her husband live in a relatively comfortable place in their sister’s house, which too Not enough power, And even water was a problem.

Damage to southeastern Louisiana after Hurricane Aida was uneven. Some homes have been completely wiped out. Others suffered minor damage. The location of Claire McGowan was knocked off from a 6-foot concrete pillar.

Frank Morris / NPR


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Damage to southeastern Louisiana after Hurricane Aida was uneven. Some homes have been completely wiped out. Others suffered minor damage. The location of Claire McGowan was knocked off from a 6-foot concrete pillar.

Frank Morris / NPR

“We had to drain the water from Bayeux because we ran out of water for a couple of days,” McGowan says with a smile. “My husband and I brought an ice chest for our children to use the toilet. We have to do what we have to do,” she laughed.

We have to do what we have to do

McGowan says he’s just putting his life in the hands of God. It’s a refrain here, keep going, and somehow this will all be resolved. Many people here have a deep religious belief.

Backing up the street will keep your life going. Leydi Lopez is preparing to make a special meal.

“I make some typical foods from Mexico. It’s a mole,” says Lopez. “We had been eating eggs for a week. Yeah. So we decided to do something else today.”

The family here is facing a much tougher decision this month. Look forward to patching this trailer, as it was after the hurricane roller struck last year, and a few years before the next natural disaster. Find a safer place to call it home, or pack it up.

The city of Galliano, Louisiana has continued to recover after Hurricane Aida struck the southeastern part of the state on August 29. In addition to the destruction, over 100,000 homes and businesses are still losing power.

Win McNamie / Getty Images


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The city of Galliano, Louisiana has continued to recover after Hurricane Aida struck the southeastern part of the state on August 29. In addition to the destruction, over 100,000 homes and businesses are still losing power.

Win McNamie / Getty Images

A few weeks after Hurricane Aida, tens of thousands of Luizians still don’t have the power: NPR

Source link A few weeks after Hurricane Aida, tens of thousands of Luizians still don’t have the power: NPR

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