New Orleans

A man died last month after police pinned him to the ground. Some now want the practice outlawed – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-05-03 22:57:00 –

Police across the United States typically place combat suspects face down and push their backs down with their hands, elbows, or knees for control. It is not supposed to be done “for a long time” as it can lead to injury or death. But how much time is appropriate? The question and face-to-face method have been in the limelight after a police video released last week showed that a Northern California police officer was struggling for more than five minutes while lying face down with a man. I will. He died. Two days after the video was released, a Southern California jury awarded more than $ 2 million to a family of homeless men who died in 2018 after Anaheim officials detained him using a similar technique. Did. Former police officers in the Los Angeles area are now trying to outlaw a technique known as “positional asphyxia” that creates substantial risk. Given that most departments have already restricted practices, legislative police oppose it as ambiguous or unnecessary. Related video: According to experts, Floyd died of positional asphyxia. “This does not mean that police officers can no longer detain anyone when needed for public security, but that they cannot prevent someone from breathing or losing oxygen when detained. “Democrat Mike Gypson said in a statement that George Floyd died in Minneapolis last year, kneeling for nearly nine minutes, and Antioc’s San Francisco Bay Area before Christmas. Cited the death of California, where police were involved in the community. After 26-year-old Mario Gonzalez died on April 19. A body camera video released last week pinned him by four Alameda police employees. Police officers said he was confused or drunk after receiving a 911 call that appeared to be breaking the security tag from a bottle of alcohol in his shopping basket. Faced him, the policy manual for the graphics department states that the suspect “does not leave it in the stomach for long periods of time as it can reduce a person’s breathing ability.” “Every department has a policy on this,” said Ed Obayashi, the user of. -A compulsory law enforcement consultant, deputy sheriff and legal adviser to the Plumas County Sheriff’s Office, California. “All law enforcement agencies train and advise police officers and warn of this highly detained issue, positional asphyxia.” A police tactical expert who spent nearly 30 years at the Los Angeles Police Department. Timothy T. Williams Jr. needs to be clearer. “The policy needs to be more specific and directed. If he or she is handcuffed, they are immediately removed from the prone position, placed on their side, and set if possible. Should be done, “Williams said. Otherwise, “You leave everything to a subjective interpretation: what may be short to you may be long to me.” That’s not new: 1995 Bulletin from the US Department of Justice “Get him as soon as the suspect is handcuffed from his stomach.” Williams and Obayashi learn that Alameda police need to take Gonzales to his side sooner. I agree that I should have been. In fact, this video captures a police officer proposing to do so about 15 seconds before Gonzales loses consciousness. Another officer refused, apparently afraid of losing his grip. In the video, even when Gonzales is out of breath, one officer puts his elbows on Gonzales’ neck and his knees on his shoulders, while another officer puts his knees on his back and leaves them there for about four minutes. It looks like you are. Police handcuffed him about two minutes after fixing him to the ground, but did not turn him back until three minutes after he lost consciousness. From a medical point of view, he said that oxygen or blood flow restrictions were too long. “There is no safe and clear way to put someone in this position and reduce oxygen,” said Nicole Rosendale, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco. “From this position, there is no way to predict who is at high or low risk of complications.” This prohibits exerting pressure or weight on the neck, torso, back, or spawning of a detained person. California This is the premise of the state ban. The California Sheriffs Association said the language was too broad, it was too difficult to determine violations, and the ban gave less choice to violent suspects and increased the likelihood of using batons and stun guns. It was. The California State Legislature said last year after Floyd’s death, police banned the use of arm-based grips, including strangulation that put pressure on a person’s trachea, and the carotid arteries hold it. It slows blood flow to the brain. It is equally common for police stations in Los Angeles and New York to hogtie or hogtie combat suspects by tying their ankles to their wrists behind their backs, some of which abandoned that practice almost a quarter of a century ago. Alison Berry Wilkinson, a lawyer for Alameda’s police officer, said, “Given the intensity of the efforts to avoid Gonzales’ grasp, we used as little force as possible.” She said the police had never pushed down hard enough to hold his breath. Eugene O’Donnell, a former New York Police Department officer and professor of police research at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, said the body camera footage of Gonzales’ arrest was “when the situation became physical. A training video for those who can reasonably ascertain the difficulty. “” What is currently being done at many police stations is a ban that makes physical arrest very difficult. Avoid the chest and stomach someone. Don’t put them on, avoid their necks, “said O’Donnell. “And there is always the possibility of dying in a situation where someone is arrested.”

Police across the United States typically place combat suspects face down and push their backs down with their hands, elbows, or knees for control.

It is not supposed to be done “for a long time” as it can lead to injury or death. But how much time is appropriate?

That question and face-to-face method are in the limelight after a police video released last week showed a Northern California police officer wrestling with a man for more than five minutes while he was lying down. ..

He died. Two days after the video was released, a Southern California jury awarded more than $ 2 million to a family of homeless men who died in 2018 after Anaheim officials detained him using a similar technique. Did.

Former police officers in the Los Angeles area are now trying to outlaw a technique known as “positional asphyxia” that creates substantial risk. Given that most departments have already restricted practices, legislative police oppose it as ambiguous or unnecessary.

Related Video: Experts Say Floyd Died of Positional Asphyxia

Democrat Mike Gipson said in a statement, “This does not mean that no one can be detained when police officers need it for public security, but someone breathes or loses oxygen when detaining. It means that you can’t prevent it from happening. ”

He quoted George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis last year. He knelt as an officer for nearly nine minutes, citing a police-involved death in the San Francisco Bay Area community in Antioch before Christmas.

The law has received more attention after the death of 26-year-old Mario Gonzales on April 19. A body camera video released last week showed that he was pinned by four Alameda police station employees. Police officers confronted him after receiving a 911 call that he seemed confused or drunk and seemed to have removed the security tag from the bottle of alcohol he had in his shopping cart.

Related video: Video shows Mario Gonzalez being pinned by Alameda officers before his death

WARNING: Video may be considered graphic

The agency’s policy statement states that the suspect “should not be in the stomach for long periods of time as it may reduce respiratory capacity.”

“All departments have a policy on this,” said Ed Obayashi, a law enforcement use of force consultant, deputy sheriff and legal adviser to the Plumas County Sheriff’s Office in California. It was. “All law enforcement agencies train and advise police officers and warn of this highly detained issue: positional asphyxia.”

Timothy T. Williams, Jr., a police tactical expert who spent nearly 30 years at the Los Angeles Police Department, said the policy should be clearer.

“The policy needs to be more specific and directed. If he or she is handcuffed, they are immediately removed from the prone position, placed on their side, and set if possible. Should be done, “Williams said. Otherwise, “You leave everything to a subjective interpretation: what may be short for you may be long for me.”

It’s not new. A 1995 bulletin from the US Department of Justice advised authorities, “As soon as the suspect is handcuffed, take him off his stomach.”

Williams and Obayashi agree that Alameda police officers should have known that Gonzales needed to be taken to his side sooner. In fact, this video captures a police officer proposing to do so about 15 seconds before Gonzales loses consciousness. Another officer refused, apparently afraid of losing his grip.

In the video, even when Gonzales is out of breath, one officer puts his elbows on Gonzales’ neck and his knees on his shoulders, while another officer puts his knees on his back and leaves them there for about four minutes. It looks like you are. Policeman handcuffed him about two minutes after fixing him to the ground, but did not lie on his back until three minutes after he lost consciousness.

Nicole Rosendale, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, said that from a medical point of view, oxygen and blood flow restrictions were too long.

“There is no safe and clear way to put someone in this position and reduce oxygen,” she said. “There is no way to predict who is at high or low risk of complications from this positioning.”

This is a proposed California ban premise that prohibits applying pressure or weight to the neck, torso, or back of a detained person, or placing the face up or down without proper supervision.

The California Sheriffs Association said the language was too broad, too difficult to determine violations, and banning would give police officers less options for violent suspects and increase their chances of using batons and stun guns.

The National Assembly of Parliament said Nevada had enacted a similar ban last year as part of broader legislation.

After Floyd’s death, California last year banned police from using arm-based grips. This includes strangler figs, which put pressure on a person’s trachea, and carotid hold, which slows blood flow to the brain.

It is equally common for police stations in Los Angeles and New York to hogtie or hogtie combat suspects by tying their ankles to their wrists behind their backs, some of which abandoned that practice almost a quarter of a century ago. Was blamed on too many dead.

Alison Berry Wilkinson, a lawyer for Alameda’s police officer, said, “Given the intensity of the efforts to avoid Gonzales’ grasp, we used the lowest possible force.” She said the policeman had never pushed him down hard enough to hold his breath.

Eugene O’Donnell, a former New York Police Department officer and professor of police research at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, said the body camera footage of Gonzales’ arrest “sees how difficult it is. It’s a training video for people who are fairly fair. ” When the situation becomes physical. “

“What is currently being done at many police stations is a ban that makes physical arrest very difficult. Avoid the chest, keep someone off the stomach, and avoid the neck,” O’Donnell said. I am. “And there is always the possibility of dying in a situation where someone is arrested.”

A man died last month after police pinned him to the ground. Some now want the practice outlawed Source link A man died last month after police pinned him to the ground. Some now want the practice outlawed

Back to top button