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“A Quiet Place Part II” Review: Shh! That’s good

“A Quiet Place Part II” was scheduled to hit the multiplex shortly after its world premiere in New York in March 2020, but the movie returned to the shelves to wait for a pandemic rather than being a prey to streaming. I did.

It is also a good point that it is suitable for a large screen. Note that, technically speaking, no sequel was as distinctive as the 2018 original. A horror thriller with powerful and dramatic assumptions and a well-developed character. This follow-up provides a solid satisfaction of suspense and intensity without the joy of discovery. But personally, the screening of critics was the first cinema since the closure of Covid-19, and I was very excited to be there. Silence — I’m the ultimate value of the work It may not be the most objective judge.

The action begins shortly after the first movie ends. The surviving members of the Abbott family are visibly older, mostly like sister Regan (Millicent Simmonds) and her child’s brother Marcus (Noah Jupe), but nothing can be done with it. No problem at all. We quickly get caught up in the plight of our brothers, mothers, Evelyn (Emily Blunt), and Evelyn’s newborn son. The faint sound devours the unfortunate human who made it.

Husband and father Lee (John Krasinski) appear in the preface, but this is the only chance to meet him again. Lee used to give his life for his family, but in this story, death means death. In the once picturesque corner of New York, it’s the home school where everyone protects themselves from horrific harm. Is the responsibility of. However, Evelyn gets more help than you can imagine from Regan. Many of the great ideas in this movie worked well, but the really great idea is to turn an already brave and witty hearing-impaired daughter into a full-fledged action heroine. This decision is due to Krasinski, who was the same director as before, but this time it’s not a collaboration with co-workers Scott Beck and Bryan Woods in the script of the previous work, but his own. It is based on the script.

In A Quiet Place Part 2, Regan (Millicent Simmonds), Marcus (Noah Jupe) and Evelyn (Emily Blunt) bravely confront the unknown.


Photo:

Paramount Pictures

“We can save us,” Regan signs his mother, your mind heads into the wilderness with her, puts a cochlear implant in place, puts a shotgun on her shoulder, and a radio. I am determined to find the source of the song that comes from the station. On an island off the coast. But why does a deaf girl choose to follow the Golden Oldies siren call, no matter how brave? Because, without compromising your viewing enjoyment, that is, attending the theater Regan sees the song “Beyond the Sea” as a chord, not just an anthem that randomly flows in a loop at an abandoned station, so I can tell you the fun of doing it. Certain signals suggest that the wreckage of other civilizations is still waiting to be found. (She isn’t always supportive, but she joins with one of her father’s friends, Emmet. He’s always played by the talented Cillian Murphy with cheerful and sporadic delight.)

In the original review, I thank you for what I call sensory overload, or the clever use of silence that enhances suspense (the smallest sound that can trigger a creature’s attack) and represents Regan’s auditory perspective. Represented. The sequel is equally clever in that it alternates between sound and silence, and as before, it may take a long time for a silent film. Some of those stretches are almost intolerably intense or claustrophobic. But the filmmaker’s art is otherwise inadequate. The running time is only 97 minutes, but the pace is slow. (Original was 90 minutes, but includes 6 minutes of end credits.) At some point, the elegant and simple style was cluttered with different types of zombies, interstituting for dramatic effects. Using cuts is almost comically abusive.

Still, the main performance is exceptional (Mr. Brandt gives her everything again, but there are many). The settings are memorable (abandoned steel mills, wrecked trains that turn into haunted houses). And with the big screens, speakers, and subwoofers of the theater, the effects of that premise are amplified as they should be. Do you remember the theater? To get to them, you need to leave your apartment or home and go outside. Then you pay to go into a place where you sit in the dark with some strangers and some you don’t know, and you see a much bigger sight than you. Watching a movie is a great way.

Write to Joe Morgenstern joe.morgenstern@wsj.com

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“A Quiet Place Part II” Review: Shh! That’s good

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