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After Ida, Louisiana’s oyster farmers fight for family business – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-09-27 19:59:00 –

It doesn’t take long to learn what’s important to Tony Tesvich. Look at the name he gave his boat. “Legacy” “We are trying to survive the legacy of our people, our family, to produce oysters,” said Tesvic, the fourth-generation oyster farmer at the southern tip. Prakemin parish. “We are very proud to bring these to New Orleans restaurants.” But the soft-speaking man who joined the family business nearly 40 years ago is entering a better era. Hurricane Aida choked the oyster in the cage and hurriedly sent emotions into the cage. “There are 6 feet of storm waves and 6 feet of waves above them, and these cages are picked up and left,” Tesvich said, referring to the damage the hurricane zeta suffered about a year ago. “It seems very difficult to catch up during these hurricanes,” said one restaurant that Tesvic deals with, hoping for help. The Side Car Oyster Bar, located in New Orleans’ Central Business District, hosted a “Happy Hour” fundraising activity on Monday night. The proceeds will go to rebuild part of Tesvic’s farm and two oyster farms in Grand Isle. “My life has improved essentially by knowing them,” said Lindsay Allday, who runs the sidecar oyster program. “They are all very diligent people. They are all very pleased to share their products with the world.” According to Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing, the commercial oyster industry in Louisiana Responsible for about 4,000 jobs and $ 317 million each year. board. The board also found that 70% of the oysters caught in the United States came from the Gulf of Mexico. Tesvich says it can take a year for the industry to regain its normal strength. Meanwhile, he will continue fishing. “You work with Mother Nature,” he said. “You work outdoors. That’s what I enjoy.”

It doesn’t take long to learn what’s important to Tony Tesvich. Look at what he named his boat “legacy”.

Tesvich, a fourth-generation oyster farmer living at the southern tip of the Plaquemines parish, said: “We are very proud to bring these to restaurants in New Orleans.”

However, the soft way of speaking, which joined the family business nearly 40 years ago, is entering a better era. Hurricane Aida choked the oyster in the cage and hurriedly sent emotions into the cage. Other cages in his property disappeared.

“Because of the 6-foot storm wave and the 6-foot wave above it, these cages will be picked up and left,” said Tesvic, noting the damage the hurricane zeta did just about a year ago. .. “It seems very difficult to catch up during these hurricanes.”

One of the restaurants Tesvich deals with wants help. The Side Car Oyster Bar, located in New Orleans’ Central Business District, hosted a “Happy Hour” fundraising activity on Monday night. The proceeds will go to rebuild part of Tesvic’s farm and two oyster farms in Grand Isle.

“My life has improved essentially by knowing them,” said Lindsay Allday, who runs the sidecar oyster program. “They are all very diligent people. They are all very pleased to share their products with the world.”

According to the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board, the Louisiana commercial oyster industry is responsible for about 4,000 jobs and $ 317 million each year. The board also found that 70% of the oysters caught in the United States came from the Gulf of Mexico.

It could be a year before the industry regains its normal strength, Tesvic said. Meanwhile, he continues fishing.

“You are working with Mother Nature,” he said. “You work outdoors. That’s what I enjoy.”

After Ida, Louisiana’s oyster farmers fight for family business Source link After Ida, Louisiana’s oyster farmers fight for family business

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