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Amazon wants to train 29 million people to work in the cloud

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Com Inc. will announce on Thursday that 29 million people around the world will support retraining by 2025 and give new skills to the role of cloud computing as pandemics ruin many careers. is.

Last year, the online giant promised $ 700 million to re-skill 100,000 in-house workers in the United States. The new initiative is based on existing programs and includes new programs in partnership with nonprofits, schools and others.

Amazon’s latest initiative is aimed at people who aren’t yet employed by the company. The idea is to provide people with the education they need to work in cloud computing for many employers trying to fill their high-tech positions. Some participants may find a job on Amazon, but are more likely to be hired by other companies, including many companies that use Amazon Web Services, the cloud arm of online retailers. ..

Free training could help those looking to prepare entry-level support positions and existing engineers to expand their expertise in areas such as machine learning and cybersecurity, the company said. Says.

Teresa Carlson, vice president of Amazon Web Services, says almost every day from clients that many organizations are migrating their applications and processes to the cloud and cannot find the right people to do their technical work. Say you are listening.

“Customers need the right skills to carry out digital transformation,” she says.

Employment data show that the pace of employment slowed significantly in November. The WSJ’s Eric Morath analyzes why the labor market recovery has lost momentum.Photo: Jeff Chiba / Associated Press

Amazon refused to disclose the cost of the new training program, but improved industry education has otherwise benefited the company. Since the beginning of this year, we have employed 275,000 full-time and part-time employees in the United States. Carlson says Amazon believes that some new employees will have to be retrained after discovering that they lack their technical capabilities when they enter the door.

“When we spend as much time hiring people and picking the right people, it’s a bit frustrating to bring them in and we need to spend another year or more to speed up their skills. There is, “she said. .. “We implemented these programs because we see it ourselves. We hear it from our customers and partners and that’s right.”

More sophisticated cloud skills can be very important to Amazon’s business. The company’s cloud division has become one of the most important profit drivers. Sales for the quarter ended September 30 were $ 11.6 billion, an increase of 29% over the previous year.

Most of Amazon’s courses can be taken remotely through Amazon itself or through partners focused on helping people find new careers. These organizations are located from Newark, NJ to Missoula, Montana, and internationally from Nigeria to Australia.

The content is very different. One two-day program prepares students to work as entry-level fiber optic fusion splicing technicians. This is a high-demand area that includes testing and installing delicate cables made up of tiny glass tubes that power cloud data centers. Another course, called Cloud Practitioner Essentials, will cover the basics of the AWS cloud, while other training will focus on more advanced skills such as machine learning.

This push allows millions of workers to navigate job changes without incurring sudden debt when many quit their jobs and are exposed to student loan burdens. ..

According to a report commissioned by Amazon and conducted by researchers at Accenture PLC, a leading consulting firm, 33 million Americans are at risk of what the author calls an “opportunity job” or the prospect of growth. In an industry that is considered low. Many of those positions are in the digital arena.

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The obstacles to retraining or learning new skills can be significant. Kelly Monaghan said that many low-paying jobs and absenteeism may suffer from childcare problems and lack of time to embark on new programs. Not to mention the “fatigue of change” that you feel when pursuing a new career path. Accenture’s Global Talent Lead Researcher. Still, digital skills can be a career differentiator.

“The technical side of the job is very important,” she said.

Jarred Gaines began working in 2020 as a fitness director and personal trainer at a gym in the Boston area. The 35-year-old was planning to set up his fitness facility later this year, but the pandemic crushed those ambitions. In May, he began a 12-week course through a free program supported by Amazon, learning entry-level cloud skills taught by Per Scholas, a non-profit college. He started a new job in October as a customer support analyst in a division of Danaher. Co., Ltd.

Jarred Gaines took a 12-week course this year through a free program supported by Amazon to acquire entry-level cloud skills.


Photo:

Jared Gaines

Gaines said he’s still passionate about fitness but hasn’t missed a client’s appointment at 5am, but said his technical career wasn’t on his radar. “My tech experience was primarily to upgrade my phone to the latest Apple told me,” he said.

He wants to take on an increasingly sophisticated cloud and engineering role and continues to take community college courses, but acknowledges that a career shift requires additional effort. “Get ready to grind,” he said.

Amazon says its unique efforts to retrain its employees are on track. The company says it will train 15,000 workers in the first year of the skill-up pledge announced in 2019 and achieve its goal of reaching 100,000 staff by 2025. So far, the company’s most popular retraining program is Amazon Career Choice, which sets up college courses and employees who eventually leave Amazon. Most courses so far have focused on healthcare, transportation, or technical work, but spokespersons say it can vary from region to region.

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Amazon wants to train 29 million people to work in the cloud

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