Pittsburgh

Animal control orders woman to turn over pet raccoon – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2022-06-11 09:27:00 –

Women in South Carolina are trying to prevent their pet raccoons from being euthanized. Children near the family. Christie Mills says she had a bandit for two years. “I just want to love him,” Mills said. “He brings more happiness to our family.” In May, Mills said that some people near her family unexpectedly came to her house. She said it was when Bandit had her child in the house. “I have a ring camera,” Mills said. “When someone pulls it, it warns me, you know, it never disappeared. I never opened the door for them.” Mills said how many times the kid had before. Also claims to have been around Bandit. However, the incident was reported to SCDHEC. She is now ordering Mills to hand over Bandit to the authorities. “To euthanize him and chop his head to test for rabies,” she said. Mills regularly takes Bandit to the vet, and she claims he has medical records showing that Bandit has been vaccinated. “The vaccine given to him by a licensed veterinarian has not been proven to work against raccoons,” she said. She says Mills was unaware that she did not protect the raccoon. “I called everyone to see if there were other options besides killing him,” she said. According to the ministry, South Carolina law may allow animals to pass the quarantine period after an incident to monitor rabies, but the law seems to apply only to dogs, cats and ferrets. The notice states that other animals need to be euthanized immediately. “He deserves it. He brought more happiness,” Mills said she refused to follow the ministry’s notice that she could lead to legal action. She said. “I told them not to give them a raccoon. Let me know when I need to turn back and I’ll do that,” Mills said the kid was okay for checkout. Was taken to the doctor. According to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, there is no specific law prohibiting raccoons from being kept as pets, but they cannot be imported from another state or purchased from anyone in the same state. “Rabies are so rare in the United States that rabies is rare,” said Dr. Nathaniel Mann. When Mann is worried about rabies after someone has been bitten by an animal, they clean the wound and see what kind of animal the person was bitten by. “Different animals are known to be carriers of rabies,” he said. “Raccoons are one of them. They deal with bats, but they are the most common in North America.” Dr. Mann said, they usually give medicine to humans, depending on the severity of the wound and the animal they were bitten by. Say to provide. He knows that if the symptoms of rabies appear over the next few weeks, the patient will need to come back for the rabies vaccine and immunoglobulins. ” He says he is infected with rabies. “There are case reports and studies of being bitten by an animal with rabies and showing no signs of rabies until a few months later,” he says. Man said. “In other cases, it can occur within 24 hours.”

Women in South Carolina are trying to prevent their pet raccoons from being euthanized.

She says the South Carolina Department of Health and Environment (SCDHEC) has demanded that her pet raccoon “Bandit” be handed over last month after an incident involving a child near her family.

Christy Mills says he has been using Bandit for two years.

“I just want to love him,” Mills said. “He brings more happiness to our family.”

In May, Mills said some people near her family unexpectedly came to her house. She said it was when Bandit pinched a child in her house.

“I have a ring camera,” Mills said. “When someone pulls it, it warns me, you know, it never disappeared. I never opened the door for them.”

Mills claims that the child had been around Bandit many times before.

However, the incident was reported to SCDHEC, which is now ordering Mills to hand over Bandit to the authorities.

“To euthanize him and chop his head to test for rabies,” she said.

Mills claims to take Bandit to a veterinarian on a regular basis and have medical records showing that Bandit has been vaccinated.

“The vaccine given to him by a licensed veterinarian has not been proven to work against raccoons,” she said.

Mills says he has never been noticed that the vaccine did not protect the raccoon.

“I called everyone to see if there were other options besides killing him,” she said.

She says SCDHEC left some notices on her door and ordered the authorities to give Bandit to be euthanized and tested for rabies.

According to the notice, South Carolina law may allow animals to go through a quarantine period after a rabies monitored incident.

However, this law seems to apply only to dogs, cats and ferrets. The notice states that other animals need to be euthanized immediately.

“I want him to live a normal life that deserves any animal,” Mills said. “He deserves it. He brought more happiness.”

Mills said he refused to comply with the notice, and the ministry said this could lead to legal action.

“Or face a 30-day imprisonment and pay a fine,” she said. “I told them not to give them a raccoon. To let me know when I need to turn myself back, and I’m going to do that.”

Mills said the child was okay and was taken to the doctor to check out.

According to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, there is no specific law prohibiting raccoons from being kept as pets, but they cannot be imported from another state or purchased from anyone in the same state.

“Rabies are so rare in the United States that rabies is rare,” said Dr. Nathaniel Mann.

Dr. Mann says that when someone is worried about rabies after being bitten by an animal, they clean the wound and see what kind of animal the person was bitten by.

“Different animals are known to be carriers of rabies,” he said. “The raccoon is one of them. It deals with bats, but it is the most common in North America.”

Dr. Mann says they usually provide medicine to a person depending on the severity of the wound and the animal they were bitten by. He says they will monitor the person over the next few weeks.

“We know that if they develop symptoms of rabies within the next two weeks, patients will need to come back for the rabies vaccine and immunoglobulins,” he said.

He says that if a person has rabies, there is no set time for the symptoms to begin to appear.

“There are case reports or studies where people were bitten by rabies animals and did not show signs of rabies until months and months later,” Dr. Mann said. “In other cases, it can occur within 24 hours.”

Animal control orders woman to turn over pet raccoon Source link Animal control orders woman to turn over pet raccoon

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