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Attorney General brings Louisiana abortion pill law into question – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2022-06-26 19:12:00 –

U.S. Justice Secretary Merrick Garland said the state could not ban abortion drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and the Justice Department said, “Using legitimate authorities, especially the FDA is Mifepristone. Approved for use of the drug. The state cannot ban mifepristone based on inconsistencies with FDA expert judgments regarding its safety and efficacy. In effect, this is a distributor’s ” It is forbidden to dispense pills for the purpose of inducing abortion. Senate Bill 388 states that companies or doctors who violate the law may face up to six months’ imprisonment and a $ 1,000 fine. Senator Sharon Hewitt, who drafted a bill banning pills for this purpose, said the Supreme Court revealed that the decision on abortion was state-dependent and that the Roe v. Wade case was canceled on Friday. I believe. The court stated that abortion is a regulated state right, and in Louisiana, abortion is illegal unless the mother is at risk or protects the mother if the baby cannot survive. ” Said. Hewitt, the first district of the state, also revealed that pills are not illegal in the state. Use to induce an abortion is limited unless the mother’s life is at stake or the fetus is considered non-survivable. , “The Ministry of Justice uses all the tools we have at our disposal to protect reproductive freedom.” It is unclear where both go from here. The hig court has recently ruled and it is unclear where it could end. “All of these abortion issues will be brought to court forever … this is not illegal, as it takes precedence over state law and the FDA states that it is a legal drug. With a recent ruling, you will do it at your own risk, “Fanning said. supreme court.

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland said the state could not ban abortion drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration, and the Justice Department said, “We use legitimate authorities for assisted reproductive technology, especially the FDA. Approved for the use of Priston. The state cannot ban Mife Priston on the basis of discrepancies with FDA experts’ judgment regarding its safety and efficacy. “

This claim conflicts with current Louisiana law and prohibits distributors from dispensing tablets “for the purpose of inducing abortion.”

Senate Bill 388 states that companies or doctors who violate the law may face up to six months in prison and a $ 1,000 fine.

Senator Sharon Hewitt, who drafted a bill banning pills for this purpose, believes the Supreme Court has revealed that the Roe v. Wade case was canceled on Friday and the decision on abortion is state-dependent. It states that it is.

“The Supreme Court has said that abortion is a regulated state right, and in Louisiana, abortion is illegal unless the mother is at risk or protects the mother if the baby cannot survive. Said, “said a Republican representative of the first district of the state.

Hewitt also revealed that pills are not illegal in the state. Use to induce an abortion is limited unless the mother’s life is at stake or the fetus is considered non-survivable.

“The Justice Department uses all the tools we have at our disposal to protect our reproductive freedom,” Garland said.

It is unknown where both sides will go from here. Legal expert Robert Fanning said the situation is what he calls “undeveloped waters” and the method recently ruled by the High Court does not tell where it will end up. ..

“All these issues regarding abortion will now be brought to court forever … In his opinion that federal law takes precedence over state law and this cannot be said to be illegal, the Attorney General may be correct. Hmm, because the FDA says it’s a legitimate drug, but in a recent ruling you’ll do it at your own risk, “Fanning said.

Senate Bill 388 is still a Louisiana law, as it came into force after Roe’s cataclysm by the Supreme Court.

Attorney General brings Louisiana abortion pill law into question Source link Attorney General brings Louisiana abortion pill law into question

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