Wichita

Big cooldown over the last 24 years, frost westward overnight – Wichita, Kansas

Wichita, Kansas 2020-10-18 19:18:52 –

Over the last 24 hours, temperatures have dropped sharply. It’s 20 ° to 40 ° cooler than yesterday!

The overcast sky remains all night. As we approach sunset, the wind speed is starting to drop.

Drizzle pockets can occur in south-central and southeastern Kansas. Also, early tonight, there were some showers near and north of the Kansas / Nebraska border.

When the wind weakens overnight, temperatures drop from the late 20s to the 30s. Frost and freeze warnings are valid in most counties to the west and some to the north.

Sunshine will return to western Kansas on Monday, gradually working eastward. West temperatures are in the 1960s, pushing 70 °.

The Wichita region experienced high afternoon heat in the 1950s and the 1940s in the northeast. The easternmost counties cannot completely remove the clouds in the afternoon, but those clouds will thicken again on Monday night.

Drizzle and light rain are expected to the southeast along Tuesday’s turnpike, with temperatures in the 1950s and 1960s. The 60’s and 70’s will dominate the west.

In central and parts of eastern Kansas, it can rain lightly until early Wednesday morning. The thunder cry is not off the table. Overall, the amount looks light.

Thursday will be the warmest day of the week ahead of the next cold front. Part of southwestern Kansas could even touch the 90s as Wichita warmed in the 80s.

Another batch of rain showers targets the central and eastern communities from Thursday night to early Friday.

Next weekend, the system will come in by Sunday and look chilly and refreshing.

Temperatures can be low enough and some snow can be seen in the northern communities if the surroundings are damp.

There have been many changes now and beyond, including the trajectory of the system, but it’s great to see more water available in some parts of the state than in the previous week, at least in the next seven years. is.

-Chief Meteorologist Lisa Teachman

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