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Bonnabel High School students start mental health podcast – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-05-12 04:19:00 –

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and as many have experienced through this pandemic, it is more important than ever to focus on it. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that one in four adults experiences symptoms of anxiety and depression. It gets worse again. About 10% of young people across the United States suffer from severe depression. Mental health conscious advocates emphasize the importance of eradicating stigma and talking to someone about their feelings. A group of high school students from Bonabel High School came up with a method. “When someone listens to you, it helps a lot because it feels like someone understands you, someone is listening, and someone is worried about you,” BHS said. Said Marea Para, a sophomore in the school. Health has never really been something I paid attention to. I knew there was a problem, but I didn’t really express it, “said Lamees Lodhi, a junior at BHS. Parra and Lodhi are some of the theater students in Mrs. Lanson’s class at BHS. Twelve of the 40 students in her class compiled a documentary in early 2021. Most talked about mental health. Lodhi said he didn’t expect to be this deep. At that time, I realized that the pressure of life such as pandemics and school was really depressed and my mental health was not checked. “Recently I got out of a really terrible episode. Everyone in the theater class saw it. I hadn’t talked for a long time. I was really, really quiet. It started in February and really in March. It was all the time, “said Lodhi. According to Lanson, watching Lodi pass through, he began to find ways to create a safe space for his students. Thanks to a donation from the Allstate Foundation, the students created a room, turned it into a recording studio, and started a podcast called “Mental Health.” Monday. “Mental illness is a serious problem and you should not be afraid to accept what you experience,” said freshman Mrs. Anila Tobias. Lanson students understand that expressing emotions is not always easy, but it is especially necessary to help get rid of stigma. Tobias hopes that his classmates and locals will understand what happens when they bottle their feelings. I was able to talk about the problem. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, anxiety, and depression. ” Someone can make a difference. “If you hide it and store it like a bag on your back, how do you recover from it? It will hurt,” Lodi said. Click here for a list of mental health Louisiana resources.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and as many have experienced through this pandemic, it is more important than ever to focus on it.

New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that one in four adults reported experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression.

Youth mental health is also deteriorating. Almost 10 percent of young people across the United States suffer from severe depression.

Mental health conscious advocates are looking for ways to get rid of stigma and emphasize the importance of talking to someone about their feelings.

A group of high school students at Bonabel High School came up with a way to ensure that the message was delivered.

“Getting someone to listen to you is a great help because it makes you feel like someone understands you, someone is listening, and someone is worried about you,” BHS said. Second grader Marea Para said.

“Mental health wasn’t something I really paid attention to until now. I knew there was a problem, but I didn’t really express it,” said BHS junior Ramies Roppongi. Said.

Para and Lodi are part of the theater students in Mrs. Lanson’s class at BHS.

Twelve of the 40 students in her class compiled a documentary in early 2021. Most talked about mental health. Lodhi said he didn’t expect to be this deep. At that time, she realized that the pressure from pandemics, school and other aspects of life really depressed her and her mental health was not checked.

“I recently came out of a really terrible episode. Everyone in the theater class saw it. I didn’t even talk for a long time. I was really, really quiet. It started in February. It was really all March. “Lodi said.

Mrs. Lanson said she saw Lodi go through and inspired her to find a way to create a safe space for her students.

Thanks to a donation from the Allstate Foundation, the students created a room, turned it into a recording studio, and launched a podcast called “Mental Health Mondays.”

“Mental illness is a serious problem and you should not be afraid to accept what you experience,” said freshman Anila Tobias.

Mrs. Lanson’s students understand that expressing emotions is not always easy, but it is especially necessary to help get rid of the stigma. Tobias wants his classmates and everyone else in the community to understand what happens when they bottle their feelings.

“I was in the hospital. I was able to deal with this myself and talk about the problem before I came here. I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression.” She said.

We hope that podcasts will let everyone know that it’s okay for everyone, regardless of age, to make a difference by talking to someone.

“If you hide it and stack it like a bag on your back, how do you recover from it? It will hurt,” Rody said.

Click here for a list of Louisiana mental health resources.

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