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Brain fog in COVID-19 patients can persist for months, study finds – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-10-22 23:07:00 –

Cognitive impairment (called brain fog) can last for months in patients with COVID-19, even in unhospitalized people, according to a new study. According to a study published in the journal JAMA Network Open on Friday, patients with COVID-19 in the Mount Sinai Health System registry experienced some memory problems. Inpatients were more likely to develop such brain fog after coronavirus infection, but some outpatients also had cognitive impairment. In this study, a relatively high frequency of cognitive impairment occurred months after the patient was infected with COVID-19. Inpatients were predominantly impaired in executive function, processing speed, categorical fluency, memory coding, and recall. Mount Sinai of New York wrote in this study: “This pattern is consistent with early reports explaining the dysfunction syndrome after COVID-19. Nd has a significant impact on occupational, psychological, and functional outcomes,” the researchers said. Is writing. According to another study published in the journal Lancet Psychiatry in April, one in three COVID-19 had long-term mental health or neurological symptoms. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention involves difficulty thinking and concentrating. As “brain fog” — on the list of post-COVID states. “Most people with COVID-19 get better within a few weeks of illness, but some experience post-COVID conditions,” the CDC wrote on its website. “The post-COVID condition is a variety of new, recurrent, or ongoing health problems that people may experience more than four weeks after being first infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.” Included data from April to May 2020. In 2021, 740 COVID-19 patients with no history of dementia. The average age of the patients was 49 years. Evaluating each patient’s cognitive function, the researchers analyzed the frequency of cognitive impairment in the patient. In all patients, researchers found that speaking showed a lack of sound fluency. 16% of a series of mental skills called executive function. 18% showed a defect in cognitive processing speed. 20% ability to process categories or lists. Researchers pointed out that inpatients are more likely to have impaired attention, executive function, categorical fluency, and memory. For example, when it comes to memory recall, researchers found that 39% of inpatients had disabilities in that area compared to 12% of outpatients. In terms of memory coding, the data showed that 37% of inpatients had a disability compared to 16% of outpatients. The authors pointed out that the sample may be biased because the patient came to the Mount Sinai Health System because he was experiencing symptoms. The link between COVID-19 and executive function raises important issues regarding long-term treatment of patients, “the researchers write. “Future research is needed to identify the underlying risk factors and mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and rehabilitation options.”

Cognitive impairment (called brain fog) can last for months in patients with COVID-19, even in unhospitalized people, according to a new study.

research, Published in the journal JAMA Network Open on FridayFound that nearly a quarter of COVID-19 patients in the Mount Sinai Health System registry had memory problems. Inpatients were more likely to develop such brain fog after coronavirus infection, but some outpatients also had cognitive impairment.

“In this study, patients had a relatively high frequency of cognitive impairment months after being infected with COVID-19. Inpatients had executive function, processing speed, category fluency, and memory. Encoding and recall obstacles prevailed, “said Jacqueline Becker. A colleague at Ikarn Medical College on Mount Sinai in New York wrote in this study.

“This pattern is consistent with early reports explaining dysexecutive syndrome after COVID-19 and has significant impacts on occupational, psychological, and functional outcomes,” the researchers write. I am.Another study, published in April Journal Lancet Psychiatry, COVID-19 was found to have 1 in 3 people with long-term mental health or neurological symptoms.

The list of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention includes difficulty thinking and concentrating (sometimes called “brain fog”). State after COVID..

“Most people with COVID-19 get better within a few weeks of illness, but some experience post-COVID conditions,” the CDC wrote on its website. “The post-COVID condition is a variety of new, recurrent, or ongoing health problems that people may experience more than four weeks after being first infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.”

The new study included data on 740 COVID-19 patients with no history of dementia from April 2020 to May 2021. The average age of the patients was 49 years. Evaluating each patient’s cognitive function, the researchers analyzed the frequency of cognitive impairment in the patient.

Of all patients, researchers found that 15% showed flaws in phoneme fluency in their speech. 16% of a series of mental skills called executive function. 18% showed a defect in cognitive processing speed. 20% ability to process categories or lists. Among other failures, 23% for memory recall and 24% for memory encoding.

Researchers pointed out that inpatients are more likely to have impaired attention, executive function, categorical fluency, and memory.

For example, when it comes to memory recall, researchers found that 39% of inpatients had disabilities in that area compared to 12% of outpatients. In terms of memory coding, the data showed that 37% of inpatients had a disability compared to 16% of outpatients.

The authors pointed out that the sample may be biased because the patient came to the Mount Sinai Health System because he was experiencing symptoms.

“The link between COVID-19 and executive function raises important issues regarding long-term treatment of patients,” the researchers write. “Future research is needed to identify the underlying risk factors and mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and rehabilitation options.”

Brain fog in COVID-19 patients can persist for months, study finds Source link Brain fog in COVID-19 patients can persist for months, study finds

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