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California is the first state to ban “stealthing”, the removal of non-consensual condoms: NPR

The Governor of California has signed a new law prohibiting the removal of condoms without the consent of a sexual partner.

Lich Pedroncelli / AP


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Lich Pedroncelli / AP

The Governor of California has signed a new law prohibiting the removal of condoms without the consent of a sexual partner.

Lich Pedroncelli / AP

California became the first state in the United States to outlaw “stealthing,” the slang term for removing condoms without permission during sex.

A law signed by Governor Gavin Newsom on Thursday makes it a civil offense under state law for someone to remove a condom without the consent of a romantic partner.

“For the vast majority of people, it makes sense that this is immoral and should be illegal,” said Parliamentarian Christina Garcia. Sponsored legislation, Told NPR.

“Many people told me,’I can’t believe it’s not illegal yet,'” she added.

The California State Legislature approved the bill without objection.

Stealthing was a little-known phenomenon, but it’s changing

Garcia said she was motivated to write a bill banning the practice after reading law students. Alexandra Brodsky’s Law Journal Article On the topic of 2017, it is said that a wide range of discussions on stealthing have begun.

Brodsky, currently a civil rights lawyer and book author Sexual justiceFew people were openly talking about removing non-consensual condoms at the time, saying that victims are facing further scrutiny as stealthing begins with consensual sex.

Brodsky states that unconsensual removal of condoms is a violation in itself, but it also poses a risk of unplanned pregnancy and transmission of sexually transmitted infections.

“Experience that your partner, your sexual partner, is not interested in your autonomy, your personal dignity, and your right to decide who, when, and how to have sex Brodsky told NPR. With or without physical injury, with or without pregnancy. “

NS 2018 survey A proportion of patients at a sexual health clinic in Melbourne, Australia, found that 32% of women and 19% of men having sex with men experienced stealthing.

Pop culture is also spotlighting the removal of non-consensual condoms.

NS dotted line At the BBC show I may destroy you Sex with a man who removes a condom during sex without knowing it, centering on the main character Arabella.

When Arabella confronts him about it, he says he thought he could feel he wasn’t wearing a condom anymore.

Perpetrators are now sued for stealthing

Stealthing is not a crime under California law, but a civil crime, and those who experience it can, if necessary, sue the perpetrator directly in a civil court.

“Civil proceedings continue to make decisions in the hands of survivors. This can be especially important as a result of sexual violence. Sexual violence itself has the right to make decisions about the lives of victims. “It’s a denial,” said Brodski.

She added that only a few of the sexual assault cases brought to the police were in court and many victims may not want to be involved in law enforcement.

“I don’t want to see anyone in jail who hurt me, but I work to rebuild my life, pay for mental health care, pay off my medical debt, and heal.”

California State Legislature Garcia said she hopes the new law will lead to such other laws and a more subtle understanding of different types of sexual violence.

“I hope other states will follow,” she said. “I hope this raises the debate.”

California is the first state to ban “stealthing”, the removal of non-consensual condoms: NPR

Source link California is the first state to ban “stealthing”, the removal of non-consensual condoms: NPR

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