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Chase Kalisz wins gold in 400m IM – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-07-25 00:38:00 –

Chase Kalisz went well with the first US gold medal in the Olympic pool. By the end of the morning, the power plant team had won many medals. A total of six, a good start for Americans at the Sunday post. -The era of Michael Phelps. “I’m happy to be here and kick off the United States,” said Kalisz, who won the 400-meter individual medley. There was room for others to shine. Australia’s mighty woman set the world’s first tournament record with a 4×100 freestyle relay, claiming that host country Japan won the gold medal for swimming and Tunisia was at the top of the medal podium. In Phelps’ record career, including the five Summer Olympics, he did not win six medals in the first session of the final. “It’s a pretty good start for the United States,” said Keeran Smith, who won the bronze medal at the first major international competition. Men’s 400 Freestyle. “We executed today. I’m really proud of us.” An Australian who wants to challenge American domination in the pool got three medals on Sunday. .. The free relay was undoubtedly not a dynamic quartet with Sisters Bronte and Cate Campbell swimming lead-offs and anchor legs, respectively, with Meg Harris and Emma McKeon. McKeon blew the field on the third leg and Cate Campbell touched in 3: 29.69 seconds. At the medal ceremony, the sisters touched each other’s necks and covered them with medals. At 3: 32.78, silver went to Canada, but Americans exceeded the highest first-day deliveries (five) since the Phelps era. Ended the morning with another medal (in both 2004 and 2008). Simone Manuel fixed the relay and touched north just behind his rivals at 3: 32.81. Kalisz was the first US medal winner of the Tokyo Olympics, and Osaka-born Jay Litherland finished 1-2. For Americans by rallying on freestyle legs to demand silver. Australia’s Brendon Smith won the bronze medal. 400 free 18-year-old Tunisian Ahmed Hafnaui was a spectacular winner from Lane 8. His victory was interrupted by a loud scream heard almost throughout the empty arena. “I myself”. Hafnaui joined Oussama Mellouli as a gold medalist from a country in North Africa. “I couldn’t believe it until I touched the wall and saw 1 (on the scoreboard).” Hafnaui ended at 3: 43.26, followed by Australian Jack McLoughlin and Keylance Miss. The top three were away in less than a second after eight laps in the pool. Women in the United States also played that role. Japan’s Yui Ohashi won a gold medal in the women’s 400 IM with her electric breaststroke legs, but two Americans were awake. Emma Wayant won the silver and Bronze headed for Hari Flickinger. “After seeing (Kalisz and Litherland go 1-2), we looked at each other and said,’It’s our turn,'” Weiant said. “I think it really moved our team,” Phelps Protégé and former training partner Kalisz first mentioned at 4: 09.42. The next Litherland was 4: 10.28, just one tenth of a second ahead of Brendon Smith. Kalisz bent his muscles, climbed onto the lane rope, splashed water, and a delegation of teammates cheered him from the Tokyo Aquatics stand. center. “USA! USA!” They chanted. Kalisz was a silver medalist at a tough event in the Rio game five years ago. Currently 27 years old, he is the best in the world by using all 4 strokes. “It was the most special type of pain,” Kalisz said. “I hurt it as much as I could and vowed to do my best to achieve this.” Litherland came to give the winner a hug and the Americans got the best possible start in the pool. I made sure to cut it. “It makes a lot of sense to come back and do this in the chase,” said Litherland, who finished fifth in the 400IM in Rio. After winning a medal at the masked victory ceremony, Kalisz and Litherland roamed the deck arm-armed. The Americans were surprisingly unable to advance to the final after finishing ninth in qualifying after Japanese star Daiya Seto made a tactical mistake trying to save energy for the medal race. I seized the opportunity. I nodded to the US television network NBC, who wanted to show the finals live in US prime time, not in the usual night time frame, but in the morning time in Tokyo. This was the same format used by Phelps at the record-breaking 2008 Beijing Olympics. 8 gold medals. He retired after Rio and won a total of 23 gold medals, but Americans still have enough star power in the post-Phelps era. Ohashi helped make up for Seto’s flop with a men’s IM. She pulled her chest apart to win 4: 32.08. Weyant chased the freestyle leg, but settled on silver at 4: 32.76. Flickinger fell to 3rd place at 4: 34.90 and defending champion Hungary’s great Katinka Hossou fell to 5th place. The 15,000-seat arena stand is on Sunday’s non-participating media, VIP. , Officers, swimmers only. In order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, many people ignored the request for support from the Japanese organizers, but the atmosphere was eerie and quiet. There was a drum on the stand and some horns to spice it up. Up. With a striking touch before the first race, the speaker sang the British band Bastille’s song “Pompeii” with the lyrics “But when you close your eyes, does it feel like almost nothing has changed?” Ringed. , It was the usual business. But at the Olympics, a year behind the global pandemic, it felt like a lot of change, and eventually it was staged under strict restrictions, including a ban on all fans. The Americans weren’t dissatisfied. Seating, even as Phelps looks down from the broadcast, they are off to a dynamic start in the Olympic pool.

Chase Kalisz changed the game with the first US gold medal in the Olympic pool.

By the end of the morning, the power plant team had many medals.

A total of six, it’s quite the beginning of Sunday for Americans in the post-Michael Phelps era.

“I’m happy to be here and kick off the United States,” said Kalisz, who won the 400-meter individual medley.

There was room for others to shine.

The host country, Japan, won the gold medal in swimming, Tunisia claimed to be at the top of the medal podium, and the mighty Australian women set the world’s first tournament record with a 4×100 freestyle relay.

Americans were certainly not dissatisfied with their first day performance. In Phelps’ record career, including the five Summer Olympics, they did not win six medals in the first session of the final.

“It’s a pretty good start for the United States,” said Kieran Smith, who won the men’s 400 freestyle bronze medal at the first major international competition. “We executed today. I’m really proud of us.”

The Australian, who wants to challenge American domination in the pool, won three medals on Sunday.

The free relay was undoubtedly not a dynamic quartet with Sisters Bronte and Cate Campbell swimming lead-offs and anchor legs, respectively, with Meg Harris and Emma McKeon.

McKeon blew the field on the third leg and Cate Campbell touched in 3: 29.69 seconds. At the medal ceremony, the sisters tapped the medals around each other’s neck.

Silver went to Canada at 3: 32.78, but Americans ended the morning with another medal to surpass the best first day haul from the Phelps era (five in both 2004 and 2008). rice field.

With Simone Manuel fixing the relay, they touched just behind their northern rivals at 3: 32.81.

Karish was the first US medal winner of the Tokyo Olympics, and Osaka-born Jay Litherland finished one-on-two for Americans by winning a silver medal with his freestyle legs. Brendon Smith of Australia won the bronze.

400 free 18-year-old Tunisian Ahmed Hafnaui was a spectacular winner from Lane 8. His victory was interrupted by a loud scream heard almost throughout the empty arena.

“I was surprised at myself,” said Hafnaui, who joined Oussama Mellouli as a gold medalist from a North African country. “I couldn’t believe it until I touched the wall and saw a 1 (on the scoreboard).”

Hafnaoui ended at 3: 43.26, followed by Australia’s Jack McLoughlin and Kieran Smith. After eight laps of the pool, the top three were separated in less than a second.

American women also played their part.

Japan’s Yui Ohashi won a gold medal in the women’s 400 IM with her electric breaststroke legs, but two Americans were awake. Emma Wayant won silver and bronze was presented to Hari Flickinger.

“After seeing (Kalisz and Litherland go 1-2), we looked at each other and said,’It’s our turn,'” Weiant said. “I think it really moved our team.”

Phelps’ disciple and former training partner Kalisz first touched on 4: 09.42. The next Litherland was 4: 10.28, just one tenth of a second ahead of Brendon Smith.

Kalisz bent his muscles, climbed onto the lane rope, splashed water, and a delegation of teammates cheered him from the stand at the Tokyo Aquatics Center.

“USA! USA!” They chanted.

Kalisz was a silver medalist at a tough event in the Rio game five years ago. Currently 27 years old, he is the best in the world by using all 4 strokes.

“It was the most special type of pain,” Kalisz said. “I hurt it as much as I could and vowed to do my best to achieve this.”

Litherland came to give the winner a hug, ensuring that Americans got the best possible start in the pool.

“It means a lot to come back and do this in chase,” said Litherland, who finished fifth in the 400IM in Rio.

After winning a medal in a masked victory ritual, Kalisz and Litherland roamed the deck with their arms crossed.

There is no social distance for them.

Americans seized the opportunity after Japanese star Daiya Seto made a tactical mistake trying to save energy for a medal race and finished ninth in qualifying.

The finals were held in the morning of Tokyo time instead of the usual evening time frame. This is in favor of the American television network NBC, which wanted to show the finals live during the golden time of the United States.

This was the same format used at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, where Phelps won eight record gold medals. He retired after Rio and won a total of 23 gold medals, but Americans still have enough star power in the post-Phelps era.

Ohashi helped make up for Seto’s flop with a men’s IM. She pulled her chest apart to win 4: 32.08.

Wayant chased the freestyle leg, but settled in silver at 4: 32.76. Flickinger was third at 4: 34.90, while Hungary’s great Katinka Hossou, the defending champion, fell to fifth.

Only the media, VIPs, officers and swimmers who didn’t play on Sunday were at the 15,000-seat arena stand. Many ignored the request from Japanese organizers to refrain from any kind of support to prevent the spread of COVID-19, but it was sometimes an eerie and quiet atmosphere.

There was a drum on the stand and some horns to spice it up.

With an impressive touch before the first race, the speaker played the British band Bastille’s song “Pompeii” with the lyrics “But if you close your eyes, it feels like almost nothing has changed?” I did.

It was the usual business at the pool. However, the Olympics, a year behind the pandemic, seemed to have changed a lot and were eventually staged under strict restrictions, including a ban on all fans.

The Americans weren’t dissatisfied.

Despite Phelps looking down from the broadcasters, they are off to a dynamic start in the Olympic pool.

Chase Kalisz wins gold in 400m IM Source link Chase Kalisz wins gold in 400m IM

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