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Children’s fossilized bills may be part of the oldest art in the world

About 200,000 years ago, ice age children crushed their hands and feet in the sticky mud thousands of feet above sea level on the Tibetan Plateau. These impressions, now preserved in limestone, provide some of the earliest evidence of human ancestors living in the area and may represent the oldest art of the kind ever discovered.

A new report published in the journal on September 10th Scientific informationThe authors of the study argue that hands and footprints should be regarded as “mural” art, a prehistoric art that cannot be moved from place to place. This usually refers to petroglyphs and paintings on the walls of a cave, for example. But not all archaeologists agree that newly discovered prints meet the definition of mural, experts told Live Science.

Traces left by ice age children

Children’s fossilized bills may be part of the oldest art in the world

Source link Children’s fossilized bills may be part of the oldest art in the world

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