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COVID-19 ‘long-hauler’ shares her story – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-01-13 05:06:00 –

Symptoms were in the spotlight when Michelle Sogge was infected with COVID-19 last June. “I was in bed and I was just about to fall asleep, so my arms started to numb. And I thought,” Oh, that’s weird. ” And my heart started racing and suddenly I couldn’t get in the air, “she said. 25-year-old Sogge, who loves running, hiking and the outdoors in general, thought he was healthy. She felt uneasy. “It was really scary to find out that something was wrong with my sudden upset,” said Sogge, who works at the University of Arizona at Tucson. Sogge went to the ER thinking he might have a heart attack. At the time, Arizona had confirmed a record number of positive cases of COVID-19, but it was not a heart attack. She said the doctor had sent her home, telling her that she was suspected of having a panic attack. However, her symptoms did not subside, so she returned and underwent a COVID-19 test. A few days later she learned that she had a positive virus test. Search for answers Sogge, who still feels the debilitating effects of COVID-19, is part of a group of people called “long-haul carriers.” 19 is persistent and can make everyday tasks difficult. According to the University of California, Davis, researchers estimate that about 10% of coronavirus patients are long-haul carriers. Long-term symptoms and their severity vary. Marina Oshana, an emeritus professor of philosophy at the University of California, Davis, said in a December webcast published by the university that her long-term side effects were fatigue and breathing problems. This condition affects people of all ages, from healthy to old. People with underlying illness. Patients admitted with COVID-19 may be affected by patients with mild symptoms. Sogge came to California with his father after he couldn’t live alone. (In some of her most disastrous moments, Sogge said she was so weak that she had to crawl her floor to answer the door.) As she entered the Sakurament area, she helped. Introduced to the still-forming UC Davis Health Clinic made, doctors at the Post COVID-19 Clinic survived the virus, but had respiratory problems, heart problems, malaise, neurological concerns, etc. I am investigating people who are suffering from prolonged symptoms of. Their goal is to find an answer as to why people infected with the virus experience side effects that last for months. For Sogge, her main long-term symptoms were dyspnea and chest pain, in addition to being unable to be clearly considered fatigue. While in the clinic, doctors sought answers to Sogge’s condition and did a lot of tests. They also created a personalized care plan for Sogge. Now back in Arizona, she says she continues to use the treatment plan she was given by the University of California, Davis. “There is still a limit to 90% of what we could have done before getting a COVID. I want to be able to go out and take a walk in the house. There is no doubt that I can’t do that today.” She said. Many Uncertainties Like Sogge and others, doctors have not yet identified why her life was particularly upset by COVID-19. For most people, COVID-19 causes mild or moderate symptoms such as fever and cough. One of the common theories about patients with long-term COVID-19 symptoms is that the virus may remain in the body in some small form. Even after the infection, the immune system continues to overreact. ” UC Davis Health said in a December article. Sogge doesn’t know how he got the virus. The only memory that comes to her mind is going to a gas station and encountering someone who isn’t wearing a mask. She said she hopes that sharing her story will motivate people to listen to science when it comes to wearing face coverings and social distances. She also wants to help others become more aware of the potential long-term effects of the non-lethal virus. “It’s not a double choice between being alive and healthy, or dying from COVID. That’s not what we’re talking about here,” she said. “We’re talking about all the annoyances faced by long-haul carriers. Sogge states that support from family, friends and online groups is important, and so many. As people are investigating COVID-19, she hopes that someday someone will be able to provide an answer to her. “There is a great deal of research going on with this disease. There is so much attention right now. This is a huge priority for so many different countries and I hope they can discover it someday, “she said.

Symptoms were in the spotlight when Michelle Sogge was infected with COVID-19 last June.

“I was in bed and was just about to fall asleep, and my arm was just starting to get a little paralyzed. And I thought,” Oh, that’s weird. ” And my heart started racing, and I suddenly couldn’t inflate, “she said.

25-year-old Sogge, who loves running, hiking and the outdoors in general, thought he was healthy. She felt uneasy.

“It was really scary to find out that something was wrong with my sudden upset,” said Sogge, who works at the University of Arizona at Tucson.

Sogge went to the ER thinking he might have a heart attack.At that time, Arizona was watching what happened at that time. Record number of positive COVID-19 cases..

It wasn’t a heart attack. She said the doctor had sent her home, telling her that she was suspected of having a panic attack. However, her symptoms did not subside, so she returned and underwent a COVID-19 test. A few days later she learned that she had a positive virus test.

courtesy

Michelle Sogge goes hiking

Find the answer

Still feeling the debilitating effects of COVID-19, Sogge is part of a group of people called “long-haul carriers.” People who have persistent side effects from COVID-19 and can make their daily work a difficult task. According to the University of California, Davis, researchers estimate that about 10% of coronavirus patients are long-haul carriers.

Long-term symptoms and their severity vary. Marina Oshana, an emeritus professor of philosophy at the University of California, Davis, said in a December webcast published by the university that her long-term side effects were fatigue and breathing problems.

This condition affects people of all ages, from healthy to fundamental. Patients admitted with COVID-19 may be affected by patients with mild symptoms.

Sogge came to California with his father after he couldn’t live alone. (In some of her most disastrous moments, Sogge said she was so weak that she had to crawl her floor to answer the door.) As she entered the Sacramento area, she helped. Learn about people like her who were introduced to the still-forming UC Davis Health Clinic that was created.

Doctors at the Post-COVID-19 Clinic are looking at people who have survived the virus but have prolonged symptoms such as respiratory problems, heart problems, malaise, and neurological concerns. Their goal is to find an answer as to why people infected with the virus experience side effects that last for months.

For Sogge, her main long-term symptoms were dyspnea and chest pain, in addition to being unable to be clearly considered fatigue.

While in the clinic, doctors sought answers to Sogge’s condition and did a lot of tests. They also created a personalized care plan for Sogge. Now back in Arizona, she says she continues to use the treatment plan that UC Davis Health gave her.

“90% of what you can do before you get a COVID is still limited. I want to be able to go out and take a walk in the house. I’m sure I can’t do that today,” she said.

Michelle & # x20; Sogge

courtesy

25-year-old Michelle Sogge, who attended the Post-COVID-19 Clinic at the University of California, Davis, continues to experience symptoms that make her daily work difficult.

Many unknowns

Like Sogge and others, doctors have yet to determine why her life was turned over, especially by COVID-19. For most people, COVID-19 causes mild or moderate symptoms such as fever and cough.

“One of the common theories about patients with long-term COVID-19 symptoms is that the virus may remain in the body in some small form. Another theory is that even after the infection has passed. The immune system continues to overreact, “says the University of California, Davis. December article.

Sogge doesn’t know how she got the virus. The only memory that comes to her mind is going to a gas station and encountering someone who isn’t wearing a mask.

She said she hopes that sharing her story will motivate people to listen to science when it comes to wearing face coverings and social distances. She also wants to help others become more aware of the potential long-term effects of the non-lethal virus.

“It’s not a double choice between being alive and healthy, or dying from COVID. That’s not what we’re talking about here,” she said. “We’re talking about all the nasty things that long-haul carriers are facing. It’s hard to imagine and absolutely hard to experience.”

Sogge states that support from family, friends and online groups is important. And since so many people are investigating COVID-19, she hopes that someday someone will be able to provide her with an answer.

“There is so much research going on about this disease. There is so much attention now. This is a very big priority for so many different countries and one day they will. I hope I can find it, “she said.



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