Lexington-Fayette

Despite the vaccine, the COVID-19 test is likely to remain a part of life – Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 2021-02-23 11:16:00 –

Washington DC — Today there is a long line in the area of ​​obtaining the COVID-19 vaccine. But not so long ago, these long lines went down the street and through the parking lot for another purpose, testing for the coronavirus.

“I want to quickly find contaminated individuals, so I want to test them,” said Thierry Bernard, CEO of. QIAGEN, A company that develops and manufactures COVID-19 tests.

Bernard said just because some COVID-19 vaccines are real doesn’t mean that the tests will be gone soon.

“We are all together. It’s the vaccine industry, the pharmaceutical industry, and the testing industry,” he said.

The Biden administration seems to agree. Announced plans to invest $ 1.6 billion in testing in just three specific areas:

  1. Offer more coronavirus tests as school reopens
  2. Perform more sequencing of COVID-19 to find mutations
  3. Manufacture of more test supplies

Members of the White House’s COVID-19 response team believe that more may be needed.

“For clarity, these resources will be an important help in the short term. They are far from what is needed to meet the needs of national testing and the community,” said the response team. Test coordinator Carol Johnson said. “They are just a bridge until Congress goes through the American rescue program and extends the test completely, ensuring that Americans take the test when they need it.”

Even after the United States reaches herd immunity, 70-90% of the population is vaccinated or has antibodies after defeating the virus, but experts say, as well as how to deal with the flu. He says testing it remains and is likely to be a part of life.

“People don’t just test for the flu. They will test for the flu and COVID at the same time,” Bernard said of future tests.

It is also important to monitor coronavirus mutations to ensure that the available vaccines are still functioning.

“That’s why we hear more and more about next-generation testing of viruses,” says Bernard. “To make sure we are under that watch.”

This is just one way to monitor viruses that are still in the spotlight.



Source link

Back to top button