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Does interior design help you survive the heat?This house does it right

Singapore annual round The sultry heat is not much different from the heat of July and August on the Houston, New Orleans, or New York subways. The average temperature of a city-state on an island near the sea and equator is 88 degrees Fahrenheit, and relative humidity often reaches 100% wilting.

Therefore, many of the interior design decisions Elizabeth Hay made when building a three-bedroom home for a young family were tweaked to a summer hideaway in the United States or to make winter decorations sultry by the owner. The season is often transformed into the bargains of the city you want. “It had to read something cozy, but it wasn’t stuffy,” said Plan Hay. Born in the UK and now based in Singapore, the designer has reinterpreted the aesthetics of her characteristic living British cottage due to the hot and humid climate of Southeast Asia. “I wanted to make it not only unique, but also easy and refreshing in my daily life.”

Hey used rattan seats indoors and outdoors because the air could pass through the breeze.


Photo:

Alesia Neo

Her cooling quiver tools contain materials such as rattan, rattan, and rattan, which circulate air, unlike wood, which blocks a solid breeze. In rare cases, such as oak coffee tables in the living room, where wood appears, a bright finish is preferred. Upholstery consists of lightweight linen and cotton that dissipate heat from the skin.

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“Anything that feels hot, like thick wool or navy fleece, can be claustrophobic,” says Hay. “I didn’t deliberately use stuffy fabrics like mohair.” There is no itchy oriental rug here either.

Modifying the existing architecture to add scallops and arches helped make the house feel bright and airy. The same is true for crisp, subdued tones, mainly blue tones. Pink and red are modestly flicked.

Here’s a room-by-room survey of tricks to improve Hay’s fever.


Photo:

Alesia Neo

Pretty way to sit

In the living room of a three-bedroom home in Singapore, Elizabeth Hay designed it with a sticky climate in mind. Predominantly chilly blue, washable natural linen and cotton textiles are more breathable and cover furniture than tightly woven performance fabric textiles. For the built-in bookshelves and trim, Hay used a glossy paint finish on the Dulux Gray Leaf, which is resistant to heat and easy peeling. “The added resin seals the wood and drywall to resist the penetration of moisture,” she said. Plain weave straw rugs made from individual one-legged tiles, unlike silk and wool carpets, require less maintenance and feel cooler at your feet.


Photo:

Alesia Neo

ARC installation

Finished with scalloped baby blue shades, the upper door adds a sense of movement to the traditional box-shaped, inert kitchen cabinet. Many materials here resist potential mold, mold and bacteria from excess moisture: glossy earthenware subway tiles, ceramic sinks, and perforated full slab white quartz countertops. “Quartz is bulletproof, unlike well-maintained marble,” says Hay. Lacquered brass fixtures, unlike trendy unfinished hardware, do not discolor due to moisture.


Photo:

Alesia Neo

Middle meeting

Hey created a spacious and bright study with a mid-century desk made of ash wood floating in the center of the room. She applied an antifungal primer before applying the floral linen wallpaper. Where hot pink appears, a white background softens its warmth, like the interior decoration, wall coverings, and wavy lampshades of Hay’s collection of desk chairs. Even the pink of Victorian lamps is knocked back into roses by its opaque glass. To create a feminine space, she laid a blue and white plain weave rug of East Asian bamboo silk. It’s cooler, less expensive, and requires less maintenance than worm silk.


Photo:

Alesia Neo

Cardinal rule

Two boys in the family share a bedroom with a matching Chinese red crate and barrel bobbin bed. The fiery shades don’t warm the space “because of the blue and orange base,” the designer said. Just as a blue-based red lipstick brightens teeth, a cool shade of pigment enhances the shade of white in the children’s room. The rug pattern may be bold, but the carpet is thin, so the room is still open. In the Hygge & West Ahoy wallpaper, Hay says, “I like to see the sea breeze and feel most of the sea breeze.”


Photo:

Alesia Neo

Three-part harmony

In the cozy corner of the living room stands a traditional wingback chair renewed with contrasting welting and painted support. “The glossy lacquered spindle legs energize the classic chair,” said Hay, who also procured the spindle side table.

Etsy

I set it on a wall with a cool color and coated it with pink piping paint. Color emerges on the teak flooring, one of the few dark woods in the house. The walnut stain does not feature an undertone that interferes with pink and blue. The colors also match well with Hay’s eye-pleasing paintings found at Birdie Fortescue, a household goods store in Norfolk, England. Gorgeous linen curtains are Greek medallions embroidered in gentle shades that diffuse the sun, unlike heavy curtains that absorb heat through windows.

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Does interior design help you survive the heat?This house does it right

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