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#Election2020: GOP increasingly accepts Trump’s defeat — but not in public – Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia 2020-11-20 08:01:22 –

President Donald Trump will listen to an event on Operation Warpspeed at the White House’s Rose Garden in Washington on Friday, November 13, 2020. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

When Kamala Harris returned to the Senate for the first time in the Vice Presidential election this week, her Republican colleagues congratulated and Senator Lindsey Graham greeted her with a fist.

This was a sign of personal admission that many Republicans refused to speak openly. Democrats Joe Biden and Harris have won the election and will take office in January.

The Republican public silence on the reality of Biden’s victory corresponds to the implicit approval of Trump’s allegations of unfounded election fraud. It has serious implications, delays the transition between deadly pandemics, raises public suspicion, and jeopardizes Biden’s ability to guide parts of the country that may doubt his legitimacy.

“Real-world results are dangerous,” said Eddie Glaude, chairman of the African-American Studies Division at Princeton University. “The long-term impact is to uncover doubts about elections and what they mean for a political unity. Not only are half of the country deeply skeptical of the democratic process. It can lead to aggressive hostility to it. It’s hard to imagine how we’ll move forward. “

Republicans are closing the era of Trump as they started. Join the president to break the norms of citizens and add uncertainty to the system. However, their efforts to maintain a public face of support for the president began to deteriorate on Wednesday.

After Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani appeared in a Pennsylvania court and made widespread and unfounded allegations of fraudulent voting in an attempt to revoke the election results, a closed-door whisper about the uselessness of Trump’s court battle grew. .. Asked about the incident, R-Pa. “Let me tell you, I don’t think they have a strong case,” said Senator Pat Toomey.

And when White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows visited the Senate Republicans, he advised them to “make the most of” the rest of their time with Trump, according to two senators. ..

Republican Senator John Cornyn said the message from Meadows was “basically about 45 days left from the president’s term.” Meadows told them that the Senator “if the White House has ideas of what it can and should do during that period, the government wants to ensure that we deliver them to him.” Told.

However, there was still a flicker of denial.

“But he did, I have to be honest with you, he said whether it was 45 days or 4 years 45 days,” Cornin added.

Despite personal admission, there was no public effort to move Trump towards the exit.

Trump has refused to approve the presidential election and has begun legal battles in several states, but there is no sign or evidence of voter fraud or widespread fraud in the elections. The head of the General Procurement Department, appointed by Trump, has postponed the official start of Biden’s transition to the White House and is preparing to tackle the worsening pandemic that has already killed 250,000 Americans. Delayed ability.

Trump’s refusal to accept the results could lead to several weeks of election disputes as the state proves their tally or pushes in mid-December when the Electoral College is set to vote. It means that there is sex. And unfounded claims about election fraud could fill the conservative media without rebuttal from the Republicans and undermine President Biden before it begins.

According to a poll at the University of Monmouth released Wednesday, 95% of Democrats believe that elections are “fair and honest,” while only 18% of Republicans do so, while Republican voters. 70% believe that fraudulent elections took place.

The White House is paralyzed.

The West Wing is hollow, staff are quarantined after being infected with COVID-19, and other staff are actively looking for new jobs. The president stayed in the Oval Office until late at night, but since the day of the election, he has given up his rule, tweeted unfounded claims without asking any questions from reporters, and stayed out of the public eye.

The Republicans personally said that there was little they could do other than wait, giving the president the time and space he needed to see the results himself. Senate leader Mitch McConnell, who recognizes that some Republicans can encourage Mr. Trump to cooperate in the transition to Biden, instead firmly supports the president and legally disagrees with the outcome. “100% within his rights,” he said.

GOP lawmakers point out Trump’s over 70 million votes and his overwhelming popularity with the Republican Party. The chatter that Trump is already paying attention to the 2024 campaign has also frozen Republicans’ vigilance on his Twitter account, and is considered to have deported the president. He also expressed concern that the responsible person could make even more dangerous decisions. Drawdown or more dismissal of National Security Council units.

And of course there is Georgia.

Republicans must stick to the majority of the Senate and win one of the two final votes set in January in the state to prevent the Democratic Party in Washington from being wiped out. Trump hasn’t shown much interest in supporting the race yet, but Republicans are best off keeping Biden’s lead revitalizing his base to ensure victory in a tight spot. I calculated that it might be a chance. (The Associated Press hasn’t called the race yet.)

“Trump is doing what everyone expected. Republican strategist Alex Conant, who advised Florida Senator Marco Rubio in the 2016 presidential election, said he had been in the last two weeks. There is nothing wrong with what I have done. ” “And the Senate Republicans are dealing with him as usual. Ignore him and focus on the Senate calendar.”

“But there is no guarantee that this will work for Republicans.”



#Election2020: GOP increasingly accepts Trump’s defeat — but not in public Source link #Election2020: GOP increasingly accepts Trump’s defeat — but not in public

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