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Evergiven remains rooted in Egypt as the battle for compensation intensifies.Suez Canal

Lemons, bamboo shoots, tofu sit in the heat of the heat, alongside Lenovo, Ikea, Dixons Carphone, and dozens of other branded products such as barbecues, sun loungers, swimwear, lawnmowers, and camping equipment. You will arrive at your destination long after the summer. Finish.

Since a successful operation to remove 220,000 tonnes given from Suez CanalThe cargo ship, which had been moored for six days, was stranded again in a fierce court battle between the shipowner, the insurance company and the Suez Canal Authority (SCA).

Late April, Egypt Declared The authorities detained the ship, her 26 crew, and millions of pounds of cargo until the shipowner paid compensation for the blockage.

The ship will not be able to depart from Egyptian waters until the problem is resolved. “We are frustrated. Jai Sharma of Clyde & Co, an insurance company representing the producers of more than $ 100 million of cargo onboard Evergiven, said: The cargo remains officially detained. Physical removal from a huge ship is unlikely to be an option, as it would have to be moved by a similarly huge crane in a harbor deep enough to accommodate a huge ship.

Dixons Carphone, Chinese technology makers Lenovo and IKEA have individually confirmed that their products remain trapped in the ship. “There are a few containers left on the Ever Given vessel, but there is no significant disruption to inventory levels or business operations,” said a Dixons Carphone spokeswoman. Some retailers are considering legal action against Egyptian authorities seeking to release their cargo. “We are looking for a way to retrieve the goods,” said Charlotte West of Lenovo, but did not provide details.

The fight is in court struggle for compensation to return to court in Egypt’s port city of Ismailia later this month. SCA Said Evergiven owner Shoei Kisen and its insurance company, UKP & I Club, have asked for $ 916 million (£ 650 million), including rescue costs borne by the freight insurance company.

The crew of the Evergiven MV during a visit from a member of the International Transport Workers’ Federation. Photo: International Transport Workers’ Federation

The SCA has since stated that it is ready to accept a $ 550 million settlement, except that it lists $ 300 million in “salvage bonuses” and another $ 300 million in “loss of reputation.” We have not yet provided information to explain the huge demand. “Physical damage to the canal.Egyptian authorities Quietly revealed At the end of May, one person died during a rescue operation.

“Even $ 550 million is unacceptable,” Sharma said. “My impression is that the whole claim is inflated.” Clyde & Co described a particular issue regarding the size of salvage bonuses. “SCA said in a big fanfare that 800 Egyptians worked 6 days to rescue the ship early on. It’s a generous payment package to distribute $ 300 million to 800 people in a 6-day job. Yes, it’s hard to think of how this makes sense, “Sharma said.

“SCA does not provide a detailed justification for this very large claim,” said UK P & I Club. Said During April. “The ship resurfaced six days later and the Suez Canal soon resumed commercial operation.”

Observers continue to be confused as to why SCA continues to detain ships, crew and cargo, causing further damage to the global supply chain while seeking compensation for its reputational decline. “In many ways, this was an opportunity to make Egypt shine,” said Dustin Eno of the British P & I club.

“The UKP & I Club acknowledged that the SCA helped the rescue and succeeded within six days. This is a wonderful achievement that the Egyptians should be proud of and has contributed significantly to the Suez Canal and its world trade. It got a lot of attention. It’s hard to figure out why they think their reputation has been hurt. “

Clyde & Co sent a letter to SCA in May urging them to take into account the fact that some items on board are at risk of becoming unsold as some items on board expire, are out of season, or are delayed for longer. Clyde & Co added that expired products can cause “serious disposal problems.”

“If it is reported that the SCA refuses to release time-sensitive cargo during a pandemic, we say that such an approach could cause serious reputational damage to the SCA. I’m thinking. “Clyde & Co said there was no response.

The International Transport Workers' Federation boat is pulled up to Evergiven and some of the cargo on board is displayed.
The International Transport Workers’ Federation boat is pulled up to Evergiven and some of the cargo on board is displayed. Photo: International Transport Workers’ Federation

There is still little agreement on what landed the ship. Strong winds and poor visibility from sandstorms have been raised as the first possible causes, but there remains controversy as to why SCA allowed Ever Given to enter the waterways if the weather endangered the vessel.

El-Sayed Sheisha, head of the SCA’s investigative committee on the case, said: Told reporters Evergiven was speeding, winding and blaming the captain of the ship. The SCA requires two canal pilots to control their ability to navigate narrow waterways while still aboard a vessel of this size, but canal regulations require a third party to be liable for any damages incurred. I will bear it.

The British P & I club said there was “concern” in the SCA’s allegations against the captain, including the captain’s speeding. The speed of ships across waterways is usually adjusted when traveling in a convoy. “The captain is ultimately responsible for the vessel, but the navigation of canal transport within the convoy is controlled by the Suez Canal pilot and SCA’s vessel traffic management services. Includes speed of transport and availability of escort tags, “said the British P & I Club.

Osama Rabie, Chairman of SCA, Said Egyptian authorities intended to expand the 18-mile canal south of Great Bitter Lake, where Evergiven ran aground in March. Meanwhile, negotiations continue to release Evergiven, her crew and cargo again.

Evergiven remains rooted in Egypt as the battle for compensation intensifies.Suez Canal

Source link Evergiven remains rooted in Egypt as the battle for compensation intensifies.Suez Canal

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