Pittsburgh

Family desperate for help for family members living in Afghanistan – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-09-21 06:25:00 –

Three weeks have passed since the United States completed the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan. The country soon returned to the control of the Taliban, which it took over. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine recently announced that Ohio will resettle 855 Afghan refugees. Cincinnati. The Cincinnati family from Afghanistan is anxious to take the extended family to US Husna Khan, 17,. I’m a senior in high school. She was born in Afghanistan and came to the United States at the age of eight with her parents and two siblings. “I am very grateful for the opportunity here in the United States,” she said. “But you also feel this guilty feeling that it’s your own people, your own aunt and uncle, and your own family is still stuck there.” Khan and her family He visited Afghanistan this summer and left just a few days before the Taliban invaded Kabul. .. Currently, families are afraid of families still in Afghanistan. “One of my uncles has already been captured. The Taliban go door-to-door,” Khan said. “I have a cousin who literally left the medical school for a month before she got a PhD,” she said in tears. “It shut down completely. She can’t do that.” Khan said her mother started filing an application to take her brother to America, but the timeline isn’t promising. .. Khan’s mother, unidentified by sister station WLWT because of family ties in Afghanistan, attended medical school under Taliban control. She is currently a Cincinnati doctor. “You can’t wake up at night, think about them, and go back to sleep,” Khan’s mother said. “Especially highly educated people. They have been educated for 20 years and are now gone. Their education is wasted. Now they are under restricted control and need to stay at home. Yes, especially girls. They have no hope. “Khan’s mother said she was once captured by the Taliban but released a few days later. She is disappointed to hear that so many women and girls are no longer educated. Kahn launched a virtual teaching program in early 2020 to teach women and girls in Afghanistan and teach English. She estimates that her program has helped more than 100 women and girls. “A great many talented people deserve the opportunity here,” Khan said.

Three weeks have passed since the United States completed the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan.

The country soon returned to the control of the Taliban, which it took over.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine recently announced that Ohio will resettle 855 Afghan refugees, including 50 in Cincinnati.

The Cincinnati family from Afghanistan is desperate to take their extended family to the United States.

17-year-old Husna Khan is a senior in high school. She was born in Afghanistan and came to the United States at the age of eight with her parents and two siblings.

“I am very grateful for the opportunity here in the United States,” she said. “But you also feel this guilty feeling that it is your own people, your own aunt and uncle, and your own family is still stuck there.”

Kahn and her family visited Afghanistan this summer, leaving just days before the Taliban invaded Kabul. Currently, families are afraid of families still in Afghanistan.

“One of my uncles has already been captured. The Taliban are heading from door to door,” Khan said.

“I have a cousin who literally left the medical school for a month before she got a PhD,” she said in tears. “It shuts down completely. She can’t do that.”

Kahn said his mother had begun to prepare applications to take his brother to the United States, but the timeline is not promising.

“The process usually takes about 14 years for the people of Afghanistan. We don’t have 14 years,” Khan said.

Khan’s mother, unidentified by sister station WLWT because of family ties in Afghanistan, attended medical school under Taliban control. She is currently a Cincinnati doctor.

“You wake up at night, think about them, and you can’t go back to sleep,” Khan’s mother said. “Especially highly educated people. They have been educated for 20 years and are now gone. Their education is wasted. Now they are under restricted control and need to stay at home. Yes, especially girls. They have no hope. “

Kahn’s mother said she was once captured by the Taliban but released a few days later. She is disappointed to hear that so many women and girls have lost access to education.

Kahn started Virtual mentoring program At the beginning of 2020, he taught women and girls in Afghanistan and helped them teach English. She estimates that her program has helped more than 100 women and girls.

“A great many talented people deserve the opportunity here,” Khan said.

Family desperate for help for family members living in Afghanistan Source link Family desperate for help for family members living in Afghanistan

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