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Finding your sleep ‘sweet spot’ can keep your brain sharp, study says – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-10-24 09:21:00 –

You know the story of Goldilocks and the three bears, right? Daddy Bear’s bed was too hard and Mama Bear’s bed was too soft, but Baby Bear felt that Goldie Rock’s bed was “just right”. The parable also applies to the sleep time of older people. Like baby bears, older people who get “just right” sleep (most nights with about 6-8 hours of quality eyes closed), according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Brain. It seems to slow down cognitive decline and keep the brain sharp. “Our study suggests that there is an intermediate range, or” sweet spot, “of total sleep time in which cognitive abilities have stabilized over time,” said study co-author Dr. Brendan Lucy. Stated in a statement. Lucy is an associate professor of neurology and chief of the Washington University in St. Louis Sleep Medicine Center. The study monitored the sleep of 100 older people tested for cognitive decline and evidence of early Alzheimer’s disease, and found only those who slept. Brain function was maintained for 6 to 8 hours. Sleeping less than 5 and a half hours reduced cognitive ability, even after controlling factors such as age, gender, and Alzheimer’s disease. That was also true for people on the other side of the sleep spectrum. After sleeping for more than seven and a half hours, my cognitive ability deteriorated. “Cognitive decline occurred not only in people who slept shortly, but also in people who slept long,” said co-author Dr. David Holtzmann, director of science at Hope. “This suggests that sleep quality may be important, not just perfect sleep,” he said in a statement. Adults seeking continuous, quality rest need to sleep at least 7 hours a night, school-age children need 9-12 hours, teens need 8-10 hours, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will do. Older people often struggle to get seven hours of sleep due to chronic conditions and medications that can cause awakening. The quality of sleep you get when your head is on the pillow is also very important. Frequent awakenings or use of the bathroom due to noise or sleep apnea disrupt the sleep cycle and deprive the body of the necessary recovery sleep. The “sweet spot” of sleep is when you can sleep continuously, even with four. The sleep phase is 4-6 times each night. Since each cycle is about 90 minutes long, most people need 7-8 hours of relatively uninterrupted sleep to reach this goal. In stages 1 and 2, the body begins to reduce rhythm. Your heartbeat and breathing slow down, your body temperature drops, and your eyes stop moving. This prepares for the next stage, a deep slow-wave sleep, also known as delta sleep. This is the time for the brain to repair the body from the damage of the day. During deep sleep, your body is literally recovering itself at the cellular level. Next comes sleep with rapid eye movements called REM. This is the stage we dream of, where information and experience are integrated and stored in memory. Studies show that lack of REM sleep can lead to memory loss, cognitive decline, heart and other chronic illnesses, and premature death. Therefore, chronic sleep deprivation pays attention, learns new things, is creative, solves problems, and makes decisions. Unfortunately, as you get older, you may fall asleep or have difficulty staying asleep uninterrupted, which can have dramatic effects on deep sleep and brain function. A September 2021 study published in the journal JAMA Neurology found that older people who slept less than 6 hours had more beta-amyloid in their brains than those who slept 7 to 8 hours. Beta amyloid is a characteristic sign of Alzheimer’s disease. How to Improve Deep Sleep The good news is that you can train your brain to achieve better sleep. According to experts, it’s the secret to getting your brain to sleep better at the same time each day, including weekends. Then prepare your sleep environment and establish a relaxed bedtime routine. Yoga, a warm shower, a good book that isn’t very exciting to read in soft light — these are all ways to help your body relax and fall asleep. The rem stage of sleep is a lighter level of rest and can be interrupted more easily. When the bedroom is quiet, light is low, and the temperature is low. Remember: Beds should only be used for sleep and sex. Other blue light gauges such as TVs, smartphones and laptops have no place in the bedroom. Avoid greasy and spicy foods before going to bed so that stomach pain does not awaken you when you are dreaming. You may think it helps you fall asleep, but you are more likely to wake up at night as your body begins to process spirits, thus interrupting those beneficial stages of sleep. increase.

You know the story of Goldilocks and the three bears, right? Daddy Bear’s bed was too hard and Mama Bear’s bed was too soft, but Baby Bear felt that Goldie Rock’s bed was “just right”.

The parable can also apply to sleep time as people grow older. Like baby bears, older people who get “just right” sleep (most nights with about 6-8 hours of quality eyes closed), according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Brain. It seems to slow down cognitive decline and keep the brain sharp.

“Our study suggests that there is an intermediate range, or” sweet spot, “of total sleep time in which cognitive abilities have stabilized over time,” said study co-author Dr. Brendan Lucy. Stated in a statement. Lucy is an associate professor of neurology and a section chief. Of the Washington University in St. Louis Sleep Medicine Center.

The study monitored sleep in 100 older people tested for evidence of cognitive decline and early Alzheimer’s disease. And it was found that only those who slept for 6 to 8 hours retained brain function.

If you slept less than five and a half hours, your cognitive abilities declined even after adjusting for factors such as age, gender, and Alzheimer’s disease. That was also true for people on the other side of the sleep spectrum. Cognitive decline occurred when they slept for more than about seven and a half hours.

Dr. David Holtzmann, co-author and science director at the University of Washington School of Medicine’s Neuropathy Hope Center, said:

“It suggests that sleep quality may be important, not just perfect sleep,” he said in a statement.

Aim for continuous and high quality rest

Adults need to sleep at least 7 hours a night, while school-aged children need 9-12 hours and teens 8-10 hours. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. Older people often struggle to get a full 7 hours due to chronic conditions or medications that can cause them to wake up.

But getting a good night’s sleep is more than a few. The quality of sleep you get when your head is on the pillow is also very important. Frequent waking up due to noise, sleep apnea, or the use of the bathroom disrupts the sleep cycle and deprives the body of the necessary recovery sleep.

The “sweet spot” of sleep is the continuous sleep in four stages of sleep. 4-6 times every night.. Since each cycle is about 90 minutes long, most people need 7-8 hours of relatively uninterrupted sleep to reach this goal.

In stages 1 and 2, the body begins to slow down the rhythm. Your heartbeat and breathing slow down, your body temperature drops, and your eyes stop moving. This prepares for the next stage, a deep slow-wave sleep, also known as delta sleep. This is the time for the brain to repair the body from the damage of the day. During a deep sleep, your body is literally recovering itself at the cellular level.

Next, rapid eye movement sleep called REM occurs. This is the stage we dream of, where information and experience are integrated and stored in memory.Studies show No REM sleep It can lead to memory loss, cognitive decline, heart and other chronic illnesses, and premature death.

Therefore, chronic sleep deprivation affects your ability to pay attention, learn new things, be creative, solve problems, and make decisions.

Unfortunately, as people grow older, they begin to fall asleep and struggle to stay asleep uninterrupted. This can have dramatic effects on deeper sleep and brain function.

September According to a 2021 study published in the journal JAMANeurology, older people who sleep less than 6 hours More beta amyloid in their brain Than someone who slept for 7 to 8 hours. Beta amyloid is a characteristic sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

How to improve deep sleep

The good news is that you can train your brain to achieve better sleep. This gives your body more time to spend on both REM sleep and deep restorative sleep.

According to experts, going to bed and waking up at the same time each day, including weekends, is the key to getting your brain to sleep better.

Then prepare your sleep environment and establish a relaxed bedtime routine. yogaA good but not very exciting book to read in a warm shower, soft light — these are all the ways to help your body relax in sleep.

The rem stage of sleep is a lighter level of rest that can be more easily interrupted, so try to keep your bedroom quiet, light, and cold. Remember: Beds should only be used for sleep and sex. Other blue light gauges such as TVs, smartphones and laptops are not in the bedroom.

Avoid fatty, spicy foods before going to bed so that stomach pain does not awaken you while you are dreaming.

Alcohol is another no no. You may think it helps you fall asleep, but you are more likely to wake up at night as your body begins to process spirits, thus interrupting those beneficial stages of sleep. increase.

Finding your sleep ‘sweet spot’ can keep your brain sharp, study says Source link Finding your sleep ‘sweet spot’ can keep your brain sharp, study says

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