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HBO’s “Black and Missing” provides an antidote to Missing White Woman Syndrome: NPR

Natalie Wilson, co-founder of the Black and Missing Foundation, has posted a flyer featuring a missing girl.

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Natalie Wilson, co-founder of the Black and Missing Foundation, has posted a flyer featuring a missing girl.

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It may be one of the saddest truths of modern media: attractive white women get news coverage when they go missing.

However, women of missing colors are often reported in the media only when they notice how much attention people are paying to white women.

Its dynamic jumps jump off the screen during HBO’s latest documentary series Black and missingCreated by multiple Emmy Award winners Geeta Gandbhear and longtime journalist / writer / activist Soldad O’Brien. The documentary is a two-day, four-part, Maryland-based non-profit organization, The Black and Missing Foundation, Inc. Focuses on.

The Black and Missing Foundation has a list of missing people, including Akia Eggleston, Keeshae Jacobs, and Relisha Rudd.please click here Learn more and help search.

Viewers will meet former Virginia police officer co-founder Delica Wilson (she was the first black female police officer in Falls Church) and public relations expert Natalie Wilson. They are also sister-in-law — two tenacious women whose skills and experience complement each other in their crusades and draw more attention to the missing non-white people.

Derrica Wilson and Natalie Wilson, co-founders of The Black and Missing Foundation

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Derrica Wilson and Natalie Wilson, co-founders of The Black and Missing Foundation

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Delica speaks law enforcement and urges passive police stations to take on cases where someone shrugs too often to escape their lives. Natalie encourages the media to pay attention and teaches missing family and friends how to draw attention to their loved ones. We know that advertising can put pressure on law enforcement agencies to convince them to spend additional resources on unsolved cases.

There is no poster for Keeshae Jacobs.

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There is no poster for Keeshae Jacobs.

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Natalie too Statistics repository, She drops throughout the documentary and points out how the cases of completely different missing persons, including people of color, are treated.

According to Natalie 40% of the approximately 600,000 people who went missing in 2019 were of color — Most of them are black. She also states that it takes four times as long to resolve the black case, and the extra time makes the investigation more difficult.

“Most of these [people of color who go missing] Natalie is in the series, with Gabby Petito, Natalie Hollowway, Elizabeth Smart and John Beneramsey in the hearts of regular news consumers.

Force the world to see what has long been ignored

In this documentary, Natalie, Delica and their volunteers post leaflets, walk around the neighborhood, counsel families, build an online platform, and more, at the rigorous ground level needed to disseminate these incidents. The work is revealed. Alongside that work, the series tells the story of notable examples of the group’s work, including the disappearance of Pam Butler, the sister of Derrick Butler, one of the group’s most stubborn volunteers.

Butler’s sister Pam disappeared in 2009. The story that he urged police to investigate her disappearance and at the same time helped the blacks and the missing foundation help other families span several episodes, and how much these stories are to the media. It proves to be convincing. They spend time exploring them.

This documentary also helps explain that the established dynamics of race, society, and police often hinder efforts to attract the attention of missing non-whites.Of course, there is a quest for “Missing Caucasian Female Syndrome” – Phrase Credit to the departing PBS anchor Gwen Ifill explains that the media is enthusiastic when a charming, middle-class white woman suddenly disappears.

However, the series also looks at how police and society assume that it is not uncommon for blacks to encounter fraudulent play, so it is defined as “news” or such. It is not considered a significant emergency when things happen. Or, a way for police to end the investigation prematurely, assuming that the missing colored race has escaped when every moment of effort is important.

“Who has the right to sign a child’s execution warrant by saying’runaway. Forget’?” Says longtime host John Walsh. America’s Most Wanted, The person who was interviewed for the documentary.

And a black woman Likely to be a victim of abuse However Less likely to get lasting attention From law enforcement and the media, you have terrifying dynamic qualities.

Tips for controlling “Missing Caucasian Female Syndrome”

As a journalist, when I saw this series, I was sad, angry, stuck, and persistently asking questions. The color missing person is real, so why isn’t there a press doing more to change it everywhere?

So I contacted O’Brien and asked for a list of what she and her team believe the media can do right now. (One idea I had: the local TV station could only spend a minute at the end of the news broadcast to highlight the missing colored race from the area).

“The newsroom has these concepts about what sells. [white viewers] And what do you do? And many of those concepts are just b — s —, “says the famous candid O’Brien. “”

Here are some tips from O’Brien and her staff:

It just covers the story. If the press says the missing color is important, they can prove it – by covering disappearances and search activities, without excuses, when they happen.

Emphasize missing persons who may not be considered “attractive” or may have a complex personal history. It’s time to learn the habit of focusing most on a pretty person with a telegenic face, or a victim with a relatively clean personal history. Life is complicated and news coverage should convey it.

Reduce the time spent covering one person. Like Gabby Pettito, spend time digging into one noisy disappearance and instead use some of those resources to highlight the missing and unobtrusive others.

Build ongoing connections with groups in non-white communities. So many mainstream media outlets have so few connections in the black and brown neighborhoods that they don’t know when the people there will go missing in the first place. It’s time to connect with those communities to trust mainstream outlets in the news when someone goes missing.

Don’t pretend that a press decision doesn’t produce news. Some media managers who claim to report only the news and not the news can focus on specific issues to help outlets, especially large mainstream news platforms, stimulate coverage from competitors. I’m ignoring.

If these stories don’t seem interesting, consider it possible that it’s the narrator’s fault. Journalists who are separated from the color community may not be passionate about telling their story. It does not mean that the story is not worth covering.

Recognize that challenging traditional press strategies is the cornerstone of newsroom diversity. Many media outlets have declared the value of ethnic and cultural diversity in the newsroom, but such diversity should be followed by a serious challenge to traditional white-centric press strategies. I don’t understand that. After all, adding perspectives to change coverage is a kind of point.

When reporting a person with a missing color, pay attention to the words and photos you use. Audiences are accustomed to taking clues from the narrative framework to signal whether the subject deserves their sympathy, attention, or assistance. Therefore, the types of photos, facts, and phrases used in the story should be as fair as possible in order to encourage the fairest possible response from the community.

HBO’s “Black and Missing” provides an antidote to Missing White Woman Syndrome: NPR

Source link HBO’s “Black and Missing” provides an antidote to Missing White Woman Syndrome: NPR

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