Pittsburgh

Health experts worry pandemic has led to increased alcohol abuse – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-05-12 00:01:00 –

If you pour more pandemic wine and drink more beer during a pandemic, research shows that you are not alone. However, mental health professionals are concerned about the new habits that have formed over the past year and the potential for addiction and spiral behavior. Hannah Milmilan, an Omaha psychotherapy worker, is concerned about pandemic data. It shows that alcohol-related hospitalizations increased by 61% from last year. Related liver disease, according to a USC study. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, American adults drank 14% more during the pandemic, and drinking surged 41%. “Alcohol is part of our culture and we use it as a lubricant, as a tailgate, to be with friends. It’s not a bad thing to bond or loosen, but a lot. It has become a part of everyday life for people, “says Milmilan. .. She also said that some people can drink and never develop addiction. So how do you know if your alcohol use is a problem? If you spend most of your time thinking about drinking, drinking, or recovering from drinking. If what you’re doing is producing negative results, it’s when you know it’s crossed. “Line,” she said. Having worked with a patient at risk for 15 years, Milmilan woke up five years ago about her own alcohol use. “I’ve experienced a scary, unpleasant, new and different violent divorce, so alcohol has become a really useful coping tool for me. I started to feel like I wasn’t myself. It was a real lie that it had to be me. I feel that I need to be sociable to be with my friends, “Milmilan said. She and her colleagues provide cool counseling and life coaching to those who think they may be using alcohol in harmful ways to help them find more positive choices and solutions to anxiety. .. She saw the need for life coaching about five years ago when patients sought secret help for addiction and mental health, but did not want treatment to be reflected in medical records or insured. Said that. The practitioner offers both options in her office. If she seems to be using alcohol to deal with stress, anxiety, and depression, try the experiment and take a week, month, or year break. ?? And I think it’s really important how my life would be different without it, “said Milmilan. Milmilan has a regular exercise routine and loves to travel and spend time with his three children. If you are suffering from mental health or substance abuse, please follow the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (24/7) 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or this link.

If you pour more pandemic wine and drink more beer during a pandemic, research shows that you are not alone.

However, mental health professionals are concerned about the new habits that have formed over the past year and the potential for addiction and spiral behavior.

“People are becoming more and more isolated and worried about getting work or getting sick,” said Hannah Milmilan, an Omaha psychotherapist.

According to a USC survey, Milmilan is concerned about pandemic data showing an 61% increase in alcohol-related hospitalizations over last year, including for alcohol-related liver disease. According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, American adults drink 14% more during the pandemic, and drinking surges 41%.

“Alcohol is part of our culture. We use it as a lubricant, as a tailgate, with friends to strengthen and loosen bonds. This is not a bad thing. But it has become a part of everyday life. For so many people, “Mirmilan said.

According to Milmilan, many people drink daily or more often when they are stressed or depressed. She also said that some people can drink and never develop addiction. So how do you know if alcohol use is a problem?

“If you spend most of your time thinking about drinking, drinking, or recovering from drinking. If what you’re doing is producing negative results, it’s crossing the line. It’s time to know, “she said.

Having worked with a patient at risk for 15 years, Milmilan woke up five years ago about her own alcohol use.

“I’ve experienced a scary, unpleasant, new and different violent divorce, so alcohol has become a really useful coping tool for me. I started to feel like I wasn’t myself. It was a real lie that it had to be me. I feel that I need to be sociable to be with my friends, “Milmilan said.

She is currently avoiding labels like “alcoholism”, promoting health and practicing treatment with a fresh perspective on alcohol use. She and her colleagues provide cool counseling and life coaching to those who think they may be using alcohol in harmful ways to help them find more positive choices and solutions to anxiety. ..

She saw the need for life coaching about five years ago when patients sought secret help for addiction and mental health, but did not want treatment to be reflected in medical records or insured. Said that. The practitioner offers both options in her office.

She said she would try the experiment and take a week, month, or year break if she suspected she was using alcohol to deal with stress, anxiety, and depression.

“Who am I without alcohol, who am I without substance? And I think it’s really important how my life would be different without it,” Milmilan said.

Milmilan has regular exercise and loves to travel and spend time with his three children.

People suffering from mental health and / or substance abuse can call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 1-800-662-Help (4357) Or by Follow this link..

Health experts worry pandemic has led to increased alcohol abuse Source link Health experts worry pandemic has led to increased alcohol abuse

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