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Hot, gusty weather could mean explosive fire growth in scorched West – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-08-04 04:07:00 –

Video above: Strong winds challenge crew members to fight Hawaiian flames Thousands of firefighters are California’s largest as extremely dangerous weather can return and stir up explosive growth Prepare for a tougher battle with wildfires. From Wednesday afternoon to Thursday, a red flag warning was scheduled due to the hot and dry conditions with winds of up to 40 mph. It can drive the flame through wood, brushes and grass, especially along the north and northeast sides of the vast flame. According to fire authorities, borders jumped in several places on Tuesday, issuing additional evacuation orders for about 15,000 people. The fire spread to more than 395 square miles across Plumas and Butte counties. On Tuesday, a spot fire jumped over part of the surrounding area and several acres of brushes to the west of the flame, despite crew reducing the area of ​​unburned fuel with a bulldozer and dumping about 230,000 gallons of flame retardant. Said Mike Wink. State Fire Department Director. He said the heat from the flames created a flammagenitus cloud, producing 30,000 feet of smoke. The fire has threatened thousands of homes and destroyed 67 homes and other buildings since the outbreak in July. 14. It was 35% contained. About 150 miles west of California’s Dixie fire, a lightning-splattered McFarland fire threatened a remote home along the Trinity River in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The fire was contained only 5%. Fire officials warned that the drought-stricken vegetation burned violently and doubled in size each day. Similar dangerous weather was expected in Southern California, with heat recommendations and warnings issued to internal valleys, mountains and deserts for most of the week. Historical droughts associated with heat waves and climate change make it difficult to fight wildfires in the western United States. Scientists say climate change will make the region much warmer and drier, more extreme weather, and more frequent and destructive wildfires in the last three decades, with more than 20,000 firefighters. Assistance personnel were fighting 97 large and active wildfires covering 2,919 square miles In 13 states in the United States, 25 large wildfires occurred in Montana, according to the National Inter-Ministry Fire Center. This was followed by 21 cases in Idaho and 13 cases in Oregon. There were 11 cases in California. In Hawaii, firefighters have crushed a 62-square-mile wildfire. Thousands of people evacuated over the weekend, destroying at least two homes on Big Island. In southern Oregon, hundreds of thunderstorms struck dry forests in a 24-hour period, igniting 50 new wildfires. However, firefighters and aircraft attacked before the flames went out of control, and the house was not immediately threatened. Meanwhile, the US’s largest 647-square-mile bootleg fire in Oregon was 84% ​​contained, and firefighters were busy clearing hotspots and strengthening fire departments. “The crew is working tirelessly to be as prepared as possible for the weather forecast for extreme fires over the next few days,” according to the latest information from the US Forest Office.

Video above: A powerful wind challenges the crew to fight Hawaiian flames

Thousands of firefighters are preparing for a tougher battle with California’s largest wildfire, as extremely dangerous weather can come back and stir up explosive growth.

Firefighters were able to save the house and retain most of the flames, but due to the hot, dry conditions of winds up to 40 mph, fire alerts were scheduled for Wednesday afternoon to Thursday. rice field. It can drive the flame through timber, brushes and grass, especially along the north and northeast sides of the vast flame.

“I think we’re definitely struggling for a few days before us,” said Shannon Placer of the US Forest Office.

On Tuesday, the Dixie fire broke the border in several places, prompting additional evacuation orders for about 15,000 people, fire officials said.

Firefighters prevented the fire from reaching a small Northern California community home in Greenville near Plumas National Forest on Monday. The fire three weeks ago spread to more than 395 square miles across Plumas and Butte counties.

On Tuesday, a spot fire jumped over part of the surrounding area and several acres of brushes to the west of the flame, despite crew reducing the area of ​​unburned fuel with a bulldozer and dumping about 230,000 gallons of flame retardant. Said Mike Wink. State Fire Chief.

The heat from the flames also created the Flammagenitus cloud, a huge pillar of smoke that rose 30,000 feet in the air, he said.

The fire has threatened thousands of homes and destroyed 67 homes and other buildings since the outbreak on July 14. It was 35% contained.

About 150 miles west of Dixieland, California, the lightning-sparkling McFarland Fire threatened a remote home along the Trinity River in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The fire was contained only 5%. Fire officials warned that the drought-stricken vegetation had burned violently and doubled in size each day.

Similar dangerous weather was expected throughout Southern California, where heat recommendations and warnings were issued to internal valleys, mountains and deserts for most of the week.

Historical droughts associated with heat waves and climate change make it difficult to fight wildfires in the western United States. Scientists say climate change has made the region much warmer and drier, more extreme weather, and more frequent and destructive wildfires over the last three decades.

According to the National Inter-Ministry Fire Center, more than 20,000 firefighters and support personnel were fighting 97 large and active wildfires covering 2,919 square miles in 13 states in the United States.

Montana had 25 large, active flames, followed by 21 for Idaho and 13 for Oregon. California was 11.

In Hawaii, firefighters controlled a 62-square-mile national fire, forced thousands of people to evacuate over the weekend, and destroyed at least two homes on the Big Island.

In southern Oregon, hundreds of thunderstorms struck dry forests in a 24-hour period, igniting 50 new wildfires. However, firefighters and aircraft attacked the flames before they went out of control, and the house was not immediately threatened.

Meanwhile, Oregon’s Bootleg Fire, which is 647 square miles and is the largest in the country, is 84% ​​contained, and firefighters have been busy clearing hotspots and strengthening fire departments.

“The crew is working tirelessly to be as prepared as possible for the weather forecast for extreme fires over the next few days,” according to the latest information from the US Forest Office.

Hot, gusty weather could mean explosive fire growth in scorched West Source link Hot, gusty weather could mean explosive fire growth in scorched West

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