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Houma residents dealing with impacts of Ida now told to move out of apartments due to conditions – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-09-07 01:22:00 –

As the housekeeping activity continued in Houma, residents of several apartments in the city were notified by management that they would no longer have a place to stay due to the heavy damage inside the building. Belmia Luxury Apartments Road and Corporate Drive near South Hollywood was one of the complexes that residents were told to clean up. People living in Belmia’s apartment said they had nowhere to go at this time. Many people are damaging the unit, but they find that they have to leave because they can’t live in the apartment, causing great inconvenience. Now, a few days after hurricane Ida hit the area, they are struggling to find shelter. Officials sent to residents by Fairfield Property Management said the email said they could no longer ensure the safety of the residents given the amount of damage they suffered to the complex. The property manager told WDSU that he was referring residents to FEMA for help. In a statement to WDSU, Fairfield Property Management said: Utility service. Our main focus is on the health and safety of our residents. The purpose of this letter was to ensure that all residents were aware of the risks associated with trying to stay on site. This letter was also intended to provide residents with advance information. Notifies you that your personal property needs to be deleted in order to begin any necessary repairs or repair work. Keep in mind the stress and uncertainty caused by this situation. We also recognize the lack of local resources. For these reasons, we have already informed residents that personal belongings may temporarily remain in each unit if they cannot be removed immediately. We also provided information. Consider the various resources available to provide assistance in response to this situation. We are trying to support as much as possible for the reconstruction. We apologize for the inconvenience caused. People living there said it was unfair, especially because there was no presence from management during this difficult time. “They are trying to get in touch with us by email,” said Sian Guidry, who lives in Belmere. “Not everyone has an email yet, so these people who aren’t even here. Some of them are aware that they have to come and get their stuff. They give us a week, a week and a half to get everything out, even If not, they start throwing it away. It’s not fair to the people. The residents of Cameron Isle and Acadia Villa said they were also told to leave. It was that hundreds of people lost their way. It may mean that.

As cleaning activities continue in Houma, residents of several apartments in the city have been notified by management that they will no longer have a place to stay due to the heavy damage inside the building.

Belmia Luxury Apartments, near South Hollywood Road and Corporate Drive, was one of the complexes that residents were told to clean up. Residents there said they felt disappointed.

People living in Belmere’s apartment said they had nowhere to go at this time. Many people are damaging the unit, but they realize that they now have to leave because the apartment is “unable to live”, causing great inconvenience.

Currently, they are struggling to find shelter a few days after hurricane Ida hit the area.

According to an email sent to residents by Fairfield Property Management, authorities said the resident’s safety could no longer be ensured given the magnitude of the damage done to the complex.

Property managers tell WDSU that they are referencing residents to FEMA for assistance.

Fairfield Property Management said in a statement to WDSU:

“The referenced form was sent to inform residents that apartments are currently not considered safe due to damage from hurricane Ida, water ingress, inoperable fire protection systems and lack of utility services. Our main focus was on health and resident safety. The purpose of this letter is to ensure that all residents are aware of the risks associated with trying to stay in the field. The letter was also intended to inform residents in advance that their personal property needs to be removed. Necessary repairs and repairs may be initiated. We are aware of the stress and uncertainty of the situation and are aware of the lack of resources in the area. For these reasons we have already informed the residents that personal belongings may be temporarily left behind. If it cannot be removed immediately, it also provides information about the individual units. It also provides information about the various resources available to provide assi. A stance for this situation. We all start the recovery process. In doing so, it remains our intention to support the population in every possible way.

Thank you for your concern during these very difficult times. “

Click here to read the notifications sent to residents

All residents must move out by September 15th. The people who lived there said it was unfair, especially because they said they weren’t there from management during this difficult time.

Given that many are still out of state after evacuating before the hurricane, residents feel they should have paid more attention.

Click here to read the displacement letter

“They are trying to communicate with us via email,” said Sian Guidry, who lives in Belmere. “Not everyone has an email yet, so some people who aren’t here are aware that they have to come and get theirs. Otherwise they will start throwing it away. It’s not fair to people. Where do they want us to put our stuff? “

This is not the only place where you cannot live. Residents of Cameron Isle and Acadia Villa said they were also told to leave. That can mean hundreds of people with nowhere to go.

Houma residents dealing with impacts of Ida now told to move out of apartments due to conditions Source link Houma residents dealing with impacts of Ida now told to move out of apartments due to conditions

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