New Orleans

How a historic New Orleans neighborhood is getting its trees back – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-10-17 21:55:00 –

Keirshanna Gilson loves trees. He said “beautiful” while looking at the newly planted young trees outside the house. “It’s great to see more people coming in.” The non-profit organization Sustaining Our Urban Landscape (SOUL) installed about 80 trees around Ponchartrain Park in New Orleans on Saturday. Volunteers will set up Holly, Magnolia, Oak and more. Flora does more than just provide beauty. “At the forefront of climate change, trees act as green infrastructure,” said Susanna Burley, executive director of SOUL. “They lower temperatures, reduce rainwater runoff, and drink water.” Lake Pontchartrain has seen what a lack of trees can do. Founded in 1955 as one of the first residential plots built by people of color in Louisiana, the community has recently fought more floods, including when hurricane Ida struck August 29. I have come. “Trees are a very important part of us,” said Gretchen Bradford, who heads the Pontchartrain Park Neighborhood Association. “One of the things they do for our neighborhood is to save it. They will also beautify it. SOUL will be 700 around Lake Pontchartrain by March 2022. I want to plant a book tree.

Keirshanna Gilson loves trees. Now she has one more lovable thing.

“Beautiful,” she said, looking out at the newly planted young tree outside the house. “It will be beautiful to see more coming.”

The non-profit organization Sustaining Our Urban Landscape (SOUL) installed about 80 trees in the Ponchartrain Park area of ​​New Orleans on Saturday. Volunteers plant holly, magnolia, oak, etc. — and the flora does more than just provide beauty.

“At the forefront of climate change, trees can act as green infrastructure,” said Susanna Burley, executive director of SOUL. “They lower temperatures, reduce stormwater runoff, and drink water.”

Lake Pontchartrain has seen what a lack of trees can do. Founded in 1955 as one of the first residential plots built by people of color in Louisiana, the community has recently fought more floods, including when hurricane Ida struck August 29. I have come. Theirs.

“Trees are a very important part of us,” said Gretchen Bradford, who heads the Pontchartrain Park Neighborhood Association. “One of the things they do for our neighborhood is to save it. They will also beautify it. It’s all closely related.”

SOUL hopes to plant 700 trees around Lake Pontchartrain by March 2022.

How a historic New Orleans neighborhood is getting its trees back Source link How a historic New Orleans neighborhood is getting its trees back

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