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How Greenwood became the thriving Black Wall Street before Tulsa Race Massacre – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-05-29 13:02:00 –

How Greenwood became a prosperous Black Wall Street before the Tulsa race massacre



>> I always say Greenfield is America’s oldest crime scene. >> Discovering a story 100 years later. >> They were attacking men, women and children. Wholesale murder. >> Greenwood, the vibrant black district of Tulsa, Oklahoma, was destroyed within 24 hours. >> GREENWOOD was more than just a street. Greenwood was a dream. >> Interviews from survivors will not be displayed for decades. >> The plane arrived and was dropped. Fire a bomb now. This is how blacks were born from Greenwood. >> Looking down, I saw the loads of the two trucks passing by. >> They tried to hide it, cover it up, and make it look like it wasn’t there. >> A big part of history that seems to have disappeared from history books. >> Then I started my investigation and found that it was even worse than what I was told. >> The plot of silence becomes loud and clear. >> Some people say it never happened. Some say that nothing happened today. >> These buildings did not burn. These people killed themselves and did not dump their bodies to the mass burial grounds. People did it to people. >> 100 years later, many in the community still feel the scars of that dark day in the black-walled city. >> If I didn’t do it because of the genocide and destruction, the highway sits on my property. >> Why did that happen? It really only takes one spark. >> BLACK WALL STREET, THE RISE, THE FALL, THE LEGACY, THE FUTURE, “CHRONICLE: THE GRIT OF GREENWOOD” will begin. Good evening. I’m Jason Hackett. So many people call these steps everywhere. But try taking a picture. 100 years ago, they were led to a prosperous black neighborhood. A house at a visible distance. They can go down the street to your black doctor. From there you can go to the black grocery store. This was patience. This was Black Excellence. And they called it Greenwood. The Greenwood story doesn’t just begin with the 1921 massacre. To understand how we acted here and tell the story of Greenwood, we need to go back. I want to warn you, the scars and their scars are ugly. But to make our future better, we need to learn from the past. The story of the slaughter begins with another shameful moment in our history, the Trail of Tears. In 1930, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Migration Act. The act has driven thousands of Native Americans out of their lands in the southeastern United States. Men, women and children were forced to walk hundreds of miles in harsh conditions to settle in the so-called Indian Territory. Now known as Oklahoma. Historians estimate that more than 15,000 Native Americans died from the bombing, hunger, and fatigue. Thousands of blacks were owned as tribal slaves, mixed with thousands of people expelled from their land. After the civil war, the tribes released the slaves and integrated them into the community. , Treated equally. By 1890, Oklahoma was touted as a promised land for blacks. >> In the Deep South, you can’t get it. It’s not for you. And I knew it. And now we change to free papers Jason: By 1900, the black population in the region had grown to more than 50,000. Glenpool caused a population explosion about 15 miles south of Tulsa. Black entrepreneur OW GIRLEE saw an opportunity in this new boom town in 1906. He moved to Tulsa with the idea of ​​launching a brand new town and set up one styling. >> Mr. GIRLEE got 40 acres of land, but his styling allowed only blacks to buy this land. Jason: GIRLEE has installed a greenwood on the north side. By 1907, Oklahoma had become a state, and blacks soon realized that they were treated like second-class citizens. Despite the fact that blacks did not benefit directly from the oil boom, the headline reduction effect found many job opportunities for blacks >> The man was able to work for a busboy, a waiter. Jason: A year later, the Oklahoma State Parliament passed the strict Jim Crow Law, which mandates strict racism between black Sandime whites >> so far because blacks live only in parts of the city. A significant portion of the business dollars spent on greenwood will be spent on the Greenwood District. Because of their needs, people were spending their money in their communities. Jason: Soon Greenwood became a mechanic A. Whites called it Little Africa, but blacks had a different name. >> We had our own business, our theaters and I had a grocery store and had all kinds of businesses. >> Greenwood is more than just one block. It’s a big one. People are thinking of only one street. Well, it was multiple blocks of people who had everything in the conditions in the bin they could go to. Jason: As the city grew, I felt tension and resentment. The Ku Klux Klan revived in the early 1900s and the red summer began. In 1919, a wave of violence by racist and white mobs terrorized blacks in three dozen cities across the United States, including Tulsa. >> There was a racial riot called that. They were traveling all over the country. This is where the blacks burned down and ran out of the city. Tulsa often called them Sundown Town. It has a sign and is very open. Please do not enter the town after sunset. Therefore, the clan was active. The people of Greenwood were prosperous. Jason: But the dream of a new black American was sitting on a barrel of powder. >> Because of the prosperity that was happening in the community, it also became a jealousy tension and I want to emphasize that you need to do something about it because you are not in your place and that is not all More. A few people who feel jealous, angry, or doing more than they should be, are always racially based. When we talk about genocide, we say based only on race. They wanted to purge it. This snap really took only one spark.

How Greenwood became a prosperous Black Wall Street before the Tulsa race massacre


As we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa race, let’s see how the Greenwood district became prosperous before Black Wall Street was destroyed. Watch the video above for the full segment. The story of the slaughter begins at another embarrassing moment. In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Migration Act. This has driven thousands of Native Americans out of land in the southeastern United States. Men, women and children were forced to walk hundreds of miles in harsh conditions to settle in what is now known as Oklahoma, the so-called “Indian territory.” Historians estimate that more than 15,000 people died from radiation exposure, starvation, and extreme fatigue. There is a mix of tens of thousands of people taken from their land and thousands of blacks owned as slaves by the tribes. After the Civil War, the tribes liberated slaves, integrated them into the community, and treated them equally. By 1890, Oklahoma was touted as a black “land of promise.” By 1900, the region had a black population of over 50,000. The oil boom in Glenpool, a town about 14 miles south of Tulsa, caused a population explosion. Black entrepreneur OW Girly saw an opportunity in this boomtown in 1906. He moved to Tulsa with the idea of ​​starting a new town and set one condition. Girly founded Greenwood on the north side of Tulsa. By 1907, Oklahoma had become a state, and blacks soon realized that they were being treated like second-class citizens. However, blacks did not directly benefit from the oil boom. The trickle-down effect created many job opportunities for them. However, shortly after being promoted to the state, the Oklahoma State Parliament passed the Jim Crow Law, which requires strict segregation. Greenwood became a mecca for blacks, and whites called it a small Africa. There was a name of. But as the city grew, so did the tension and resentment. The Ku Klux Klan began to revive in the early 1900s, followed by the Red Summer. In 1919, a wave of violence by racists and white mobs terrorized blacks in cities across the United States, including Tarsa. The new black American dream was sitting in the gunpowder storehouse.

Now, 100 years after the Tulsa race massacre, let’s see how the Greenwood district became a prosperous Black Wall Street before it was destroyed.

Watch the video above for the full segment.

The story of the slaughter begins with another shameful moment in our history, the Trail of Tears.

In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Migration Act. This has driven thousands of Native Americans out of land in the southeastern United States. Men, women and children were forced to walk hundreds of miles in harsh conditions to settle in what is now known as Oklahoma, the so-called “Indian territory.” Historians estimate that more than 15,000 people died from radiation exposure, starvation and fatigue.

Mixing with the tens of thousands of people expelled from the land were thousands of blacks owned as slaves by the tribes. After the Civil War, the tribes liberated slaves, integrated them into the community, and treated them equally. By 1890, Oklahoma was touted as a black “land of promise.”

By 1900, the region had a black population of over 50,000. The oil boom in Glenpool, a town about 14 miles south of Tulsa, caused a population explosion. Black entrepreneur OW Gurley saw an opportunity in this boomtown in 1906. He moved to Tulsa with the idea of ​​starting a new town and set one condition.

Girly founded Greenwood on the north side of Tulsa. By 1907, Oklahoma had become a state, and blacks soon realized that they were being treated like second-class citizens. However, blacks did not directly benefit from the oil boom. The trickle-down effect created many job opportunities for them. However, shortly after being promoted to the state, the Oklahoma State Capitol passed the oppressive Jim Crow Law, which requires strict segregation.

Greenwood became a mecca for blacks, and whites called it a little Africa. Blacks had a different name. But as the city grew, so did tension and resentment.

The Ku Klux Klan began to revive in the early 1900s, followed by a red summer. In 1919, a wave of violence by racists and white mobs terrorized blacks in cities across the United States, including Tarsa.

The dream of a new black American was sitting in a barrel.

How Greenwood became the thriving Black Wall Street before Tulsa Race Massacre Source link How Greenwood became the thriving Black Wall Street before Tulsa Race Massacre

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