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How much longer? Louisiana to study future of $300 weekly unemployment bump – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-06-06 23:43:00 –

According to Louisiana statistics, for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began, less than 50,000 people continue to apply for unemployment insurance in Louisiana. Louisiana residents cost an extra $ 300 a week. This is due to the decision of Governor John Bel Edwards, who is sponsoring the investigation to determine the next step. On the other hand, employers say there is a shortage of workers. But ambitious employees say they lack the opportunity. Slidell’s Shari Gibbs said he had done the same job in the food service industry for the 15 years before the pandemic struck. That’s what it doesn’t look like, “Gibbs said. Gibbs said the $ 300 weekly unemployment benefit is a lifeline and it’s too early to end it now. “I work with the general public every day. I don’t have months off at a time because no one wants to work. To be honest, I’m not getting anything that isn’t worth me.” She said. But Metairie chef and restaurant owner Andrea Apuzzo said he was playing his part and needed workers. According to Apuzzo, the staffing of his restaurant is about half of what it should be. “We need a waiter. We need a bartender. We’re looking for everyone. Porters and dishwashers are another issue we can’t get,” the state offers additional unemployment benefits. As long as we continue to do so, Apzzo thinks: The shortage continues. “They want to stay home and make money rather than make money and go to work. That doesn’t make sense,” he said. Dawn Stearns McVair, director of the National Federation of Independent Business in Louisiana, said last year’s efforts to save businesses “would be wasted if people couldn’t be put back into the workforce.” However, according to Jan Moller, secretary-general of the Louisiana Budget Project, the surplus not only gives unemployed Louisianas time to find a job, but also gives them time to find the job they want. “We are confident that our economy will return to its pre-pandemic state when these benefits expire in September,” she said. “When you say you are unemployed, they call you. You’ll see it in a particular way, especially now. ”Gibbs will continue to submit applications until the right job is decided, whether or not it costs an extra $ 300 a week. “I’m not a celebrity. I’m not a flashy person. I just have high school students. It costs money so I try to do everything I can,” she said. Louisiana is one of the last states in the South to continue raising the federal unemployment rate. Prior to the pandemic, the highest amount of unemployment in the state was $ 247 a week. Whatever the state’s findings, federal benefits expire in September nationwide.

For the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began, less than 50,000 people continue to file unemployed claims in Louisiana, according to state statistics on Friday.

The latest counts from the state’s Unemployment Department question whether the state should stop giving unemployed Louisiana residents an extra $ 300 a week.

This is due to the decision of Governor John Bel Edwards, who is sponsoring the investigation to determine the next step.

On the other hand, employers say there is a shortage of workers. But ambitious employees say they lack opportunities.

Slidell’s Shari Gibbs said he had done the same job in the food service industry for the 15 years before the pandemic.

“That’s what people don’t seem to understand,” Gibbs said.

Gibbs said the $ 300 weekly unemployment benefit is a lifeline and it’s too early to end it now.

“I work with the general public every day. I don’t have months off at a time because no one wants to work. To be honest, I’m not getting anything that isn’t worth me.” She said.

But Metairie chef and restaurant owner Andrea Apuzzo said he was playing his part and needed workers. According to Apuzzo, the staffing of his restaurant is about half of what it should be.

“We need a waiter. We need a bartender. We are looking for everyone. Porters and dishwashers are another issue we can’t get,” he said. ..

As long as the state continues to provide additional unemployment benefits, Apuzzo believes the shortage will continue.

“They want to stay home and make money rather than make money and go to work. That doesn’t make sense,” he said.

Dawn Stearns McVair, director of the National Federation of Independent Business in Louisiana, said last year’s efforts to save businesses “would be wasted if people couldn’t be put back into the workforce.” ..

But according to Jan Moller, executive director of the Louisiana Budget Project, the surplus not only gives unemployed Louisianas time to find a job, but also the time they want.

“We are confident that our economy will return to its pre-pandemic state when these benefits end in September,” she said. “When you say you are unemployed, they identify you. You can see it in a way, especially now. “

Gibbs will continue to submit applications until a suitable job is determined, whether or not there is an additional $ 300 a week.

“I’m not a celebrity. I’m not a flashy person. I just have high school students. It costs money so I try to do everything I can,” she said.

Louisiana is one of the last states in the South to continue raising the federal unemployment rate. Prior to the pandemic, the highest amount of unemployment in the state was $ 247 a week.

Whatever the state’s findings, federal benefits will expire nationwide in September.

How much longer? Louisiana to study future of $300 weekly unemployment bump Source link How much longer? Louisiana to study future of $300 weekly unemployment bump

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