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How wildfires impact wildlife, their habitat – The Denver Post – Denver, Colorado

Denver, Colorado 2021-10-23 16:35:32 –

Flagstaff, Arizona — Porcupines walked slower and more interesting than usual.

Their steps involved some residents of the South Lake Tahoe district who called the rehab center. Porcupines were found to have suffered extensive burns to their feet, fur, quill and face after a wildfire burned the area.

Wildlife centers in the western United States take care of animals that have been unable to escape the flames and are looking for food in burned-out areas.

Dennis Upton, head of animal welfare for Lake Tahoe wildlife care, said the recently discovered declining turkey vulture on the shores of Lake Tahoe could not fly.

“That’s what we see in the aftermath of a fire-only animals that are struggling and being pushed into areas where they aren’t traditionally,” she said.

Is fire good or bad for wildlife?

Not necessarily either, says Brian Wolfer, game program manager at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

“It’s the landscape turbulence that changes the habitat,” he said.

Some species benefit from wildfires, including birds of prey that hunt rodents that run from flames, beetles that move to dead trees and spawn, and woodpeckers that feed on them and nest in hollow trees.

How wildfires impact wildlife, their habitat – The Denver Post Source link How wildfires impact wildlife, their habitat – The Denver Post

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