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“I still have something to do”: NPR

From left to right: Marcus Arbury, father of Armauder Berry. Attorney Ben Crump; Rev. Al Sharpton; Wanda Cooper Jones, mother of Armauder Berry. Attorney Lee Merritt addressed the media after the defendant was convicted in a trial of the murderer of Amado Arbury on Wednesday in Brunswick, Georgia.

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From left to right: Marcus Arbury, father of Armauder Berry. Attorney Ben Crump; Rev. Al Sharpton; Wanda Cooper Jones, mother of Armauder Berry. Attorney Lee Merritt addressed the media after the defendant was convicted in a trial of the murderer of Amado Arbury on Wednesday in Brunswick, Georgia.

Shawn Rayford / Getty Images

Civil rights activists, lawyers and politicians join the family of Armode Arbury, Convicted Against three men charged with his murder in Georgia.

“It was just a great day for my family,” Armor’s father, Marcus Arbury, told NPR: interview When Taking everything into account Following the verdict. “We are still in a long battle.”

Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man, was shot deadly by three white men while jogging in the Georgia neighborhood last year. On Wednesday, the jury found the man of his father and sons Greg McMichael and Travis McMichael, and their neighbor William “Rodi” Brian, guilty of most of the crimes.

Civil rights lawyer Ben Crump said the results would bring some justice and peace to Arbury’s family, but not a cause of celebration, but a cause of remorse.

“This incident should have been opened and closed on all accounts … Amad Arbury’s violent stalking and lynching was documented for a video for the world to witness. But still, the system because of our deep cracks, flaws and prejudices, I was wondering if we could see justice. ” Crump said in a statement Following the verdict.

“There’s still work to be done,” he later told NPR in a joint interview with Marcus, saying that it was only one victory in the criminal justice system that had different consequences for people of color.

“We don’t want to bear this burden of having a video to give unjustly killed blacks access to court, access to justice,” he presented in the murder trials of Arbury and George. Floyd said referring to the important evidence that was made.

The killings attracted public attention to what was widely seen Yet another test case For racial justice. The state trial did not contain evidence to support racial prejudice, but it will be the focus of the federal hate crime trial of the three men set up next year.

“Today’s verdict was factual. It’s evidence-based,” prosecutor Linda Dunikoski said minutes after the verdict was announced at a press conference.

“When you present the truth to people and they can see it, they will do the right thing,” she said. “And that’s what this jury did today to get Amado Arbury’s justice.”

The American Civil Liberties Union responded to this ruling and Tweet, “The true measure of justice is not a verdict, but a future in which people are not alive for fear of racial violence. We will not stop our long efforts to achieve this future.”

Governor of Georgia Brian Kemp said “Arbury was a victim of vigilantism not found in Georgia,” he added, adding that he hopes that continued legal efforts will help people “go on the path of healing and reconciliation.” ..

Vice President Kamala Harris criticized the defense team for what she described as a racist tactic used during the trial.

“These verdicts send an important message, but the fact remains that we still have something to do,” she said in a statement. “The lawyers have chosen to threaten the minister’s attendance at the trial and set the tone to dehumanize young black men with racist language,” Harris said. Said in a later statement.

References to Harris’ racist metaphor hint at how defendant lawyer Laura Hogue cast Arbury in closing arguments. Hogue described him as running through the Georgia area “without socks covering his long, dirty toenails.”

Nevertheless, the verdict gives Crump hope. The jury, consisting of 10 whites and 1 black, eventually made a verdict “based on evidence” and did not succumb to “the racial rhetoric of this dog whistle,” he told NPR. ..

“They saw Amad as a human being, an American citizen worthy of all constitutional promises and guarantees such as equality and justice,” Crump said.

As for defense, Gregory McMichael’s team expressed disappointment when the gallery got out of court. Elder McMichael was found guilty of eight out of nine counts, one less than his son.

“I’m sitting on the floor and laying the floor with a capital” F “,” said Hogue, one of Gregory McMichael’s lawyers. Frank Hogue, who also represents Elder McMichael, said the lawyer will appeal to the verdict after the verdict.



“I still have something to do”: NPR

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