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Italian museums are full of corpses, so they use carnivorous bacteria to clean Michelangelo’s statues

Almost 500 years ago, the Duke of Alessandro de’Medici was fascinated by the promise of spending the night with a beautiful widow, but instead met the tip of a knife from an assassin hired by his cousin and stabbed him to death. .. The ruler of the body of Florence was placed in the tomb of his father.

now? He is leaking

In 2019, Italian art historians and restorers noticed that the marble statues in the Medici Chapel, wholly commissioned by Michelangelo, began to appear more dirty than usual. The stain was recorded as early as 1595, but no tools existed at the time to remove it.

In November 2019, the Italian National Research Council uncovered what was behind the dirt. The same is true for other compounds that leak from improperly preserved corpses of Alessandro de’Medici and accumulate over time from glues and plaster. Alessandro’s body fluids permeated the statues of dusk and dawn that adorned his father’s tomb.

Anna Rosas ProcatiA biologist at the National Art Center of Italy, has carefully selected and tested stains from a catalog of over 1,000 bacteria. They experienced successes and failures, and some of the bacteria ate not only human bodies, but also delicate Carrera marble. However, the museums in the chapel believed that bacteria were more effective than harsh chemicals and abrasives.

Michelangelo's Fable of Dawn
One of the statues stained by an improperly preserved corpse of Alessandro de’Medici before the bacterial bath.

Remage / Corbis via Getty Images


All Sprocati women’s teams selected the eight most promising bacteria and tested them in a grid section behind the church altar. Those who worked were placed in the tomb of Giovanni di Lorenzo, especially the statues at night and day. Bacteria cleaned the hair and eye accumulated residues at night.

After a short break for COVID-19 PandemicThe team released the best carnivorous bacterium, Serratia marcescens SH7, via a microbial gel into a dirty tomb. There was even a deformation of the shape of the button.

“SH7 ate Alessandro,” said Monica Bietti, a former director of the Medici Chapel Museum. New York Times..

“It ate all night,” said restorer Marina Vincenti, according to the press.

Visitors can book tickets for the Medici Chapel online..

Italian museums are full of corpses, so they use carnivorous bacteria to clean Michelangelo’s statues

Source link Italian museums are full of corpses, so they use carnivorous bacteria to clean Michelangelo’s statues

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