Lexington-Fayette

Jockey Cavaliers Come Back in Lexington’s Women’s Pandemic Business – Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 2021-05-01 07:52:51 –

Lexington, Kentucky (LEX 18) — Women in Lexington are taking advantage of multiple sclerosis and coronavirus blockade time to build a business centered around the iconic jockey jockey.

“I was diagnosed at the age of 31, so when the pandemic began, I quickly knew I needed extra, extra, special caution, and it was a lot of free time. But this was by far the most, or at the moment, life-changing. “

Jones founded Riders Up-Custom Cavaliers & More, a custom jockey cavalier company she designed entirely from the garage.

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She said her business wasn’t what she planned.

“I always wanted a cavalier. I didn’t know where to get it. Still … I didn’t know where to find a cavalier, let alone someone paint it and someone paint it with the quality I have. I wanted it, “Jones explained. “So I thought a lot about trying different methods and trying different products, and after I finished my work my friends on social media got hooked on it. And I’m here. “

According to Jones, cavalier can be found throughout Kentucky, and matching farm silk or wearing family symbols or coats of arms is commonly used as a symbol of hospitality.

“That’s why they’re a welcome sign, at the front door of people, outside restaurants, outside hotels, and I think they’re the ultimate, especially for Lexington, Kentucky. World souvenir horses The capital of the city. A £ 175 souvenir that should last for generations, “Jones said.

Jones jockeys are 46 inches tall, heavier than other jockeys, and are made of concrete. “I think each jockey will take a total of about 6 hours with a normal design.”

She designed the 147th Kentucky Derby Jockey on display at the Fritz Farm Summit until the second week of May. The highest bidder wins the jockey and the proceeds go to the Permanently Handicapped Jockey Fund.

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For her, business is more than an interesting side gig.

“It’s almost meditative, so I really enjoyed being here,” she said. “It keeps me active, you know, it’s supple, and I’m long enough that you can really help your brain build or reconstruct pathways. I’m getting better. I was diagnosed at the age of 31. I’m 34 and I want to be able to continue to work with an active lifestyle for the next 30 years. “

Click to connect to Jones or order your own cavalier Here..

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