USA

Judiciary does not defend Congressman Mo Brooks in court against January 6 incitement: NPR

In this March 22, 2017 file photo, Republican Rep. Mo Brooks. I was interviewed at Capitol Hill in Washington.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP


Hide caption

Switch captions

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In this March 22, 2017 file photo, Republican Rep. Mo Brooks. I was interviewed at Capitol Hill in Washington.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The Justice Department has rejected Alabama Republican Mo Brooks’ request for legal protection in court against a proceeding linking him to the January 6 riots in the US Capitol.

Brooks, Former President Donald Trump, and more Proceeded by Congressman Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.) Earlier this year. Swolwell claims that the proceedings nominated Brooks and others helped incite a crowd of Trump supporters during the Trump support rally on January 6.

The group later indicted the US Capitol. Five people died that day.

The Justice Department says Brooks was engaged in campaign activities when he attended the rally. He is not eligible for legal immunity to his actions because it is not within his obligations as a member of parliament, the ministry said.

The Department of Justice said, “At the time of the claim in this case, the Bureau could not conclude that Brooks was acting within his office or employment as a member of the House of Representatives, so the Department issued a certificate. Refused. ” Explained in the submission to the court.

Parliamentarians may be eligible for legal protection as “government employees.” It is permitted if their actions are deemed to have taken place within their obligations.

In this case, the federal ruling seems to open up the possibility that more people will be held liable for the riots of the day.

Brooks still has the opportunity to persuade a federal judge who has the final say.

Judiciary does not defend Congressman Mo Brooks in court against January 6 incitement: NPR

Source link Judiciary does not defend Congressman Mo Brooks in court against January 6 incitement: NPR

Back to top button