Lexington-Fayette

Kevin Strickland’s brother speaks after being released from prison – Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 2021-11-24 11:22:22 –

Kansas City, Missouri — Kevin Strickland’s younger brothers Roland Strickland and Warren Thornton said: Release of their brothers from prison Tuesday 43 years later Overdue for a long time..

“I can actually give him a hug, and there is no time limit,” Roland Strickland said.

For the past 43 years, Roland Strickland has been waiting for only an endless hug since Kevin Strickland was put in jail and convicted of a triple murder he did not commit. He was exonerated on Tuesday Leaving Missouri Western Orthodontic Center A free man at Cameron later that day.

“I’ll never forget that month, that day,” Roland Strickland recalled when his brother was put in jail shortly after the April 1978 murder. “My birthday is April. I’m just 16 years old. I’ll take my brother away for the rest of my life. He wasn’t even a man. Perhaps he was a man, but in terms of age he’s a boy. He was 18 years old. “

Kevin Strickland, trapped at the age of 18 to wait for a trial, missed more lives than most would imagine.

“He couldn’t see his daughter, his son,” Thornton said. “He never met my kids. The way the world changed, the simple things we take for granted, he didn’t have any of them. He 43 I missed the progress of the year. “

The final insult happened three months ago as Kevin Strickland missed the opportunity to say goodbye to his mother. The mother’s dying wish was to release her son. Instead, Rosetta Thornton died on August 21 at the age of 85.

Strickland House

Kevin Strickland’s family can be seen in prison for over 40 years after being unfairly convicted of three murders in Kansas City, Missouri, in April 1978. I did. His younger brothers Roland Strickland and Warren Thornton responded to his release from prison 43 years later. However, her mother, Rosetta Thornton, died on August 21, 2021, before she saw her son released.

“She was a fighter, but now she’s crying. She’s gladly crying and smiling at him. That shouldn’t be the case,” Roland Strickland said. “It’s painful that she couldn’t get it done after years of holding up her son’s innocence and coming home, as he said.”

Meanwhile, Kevin Strickland made it to see his own freedom, something his brother thought would never happen.

“If anything, I didn’t expect this day to come,” Roland Strickland said. “My faith is really strong, but with the belief that they will exonerate him? No, it has almost completely disappeared.”

Nonetheless, through all the pain, what did not disappear was the faith that the Strickland family had during some of the darkest hours of visiting Kevin Strickland behind the bar.

“As you know, it had to be a whisper or a one-second hug, or they’re telling you to break it,” Roland Strickland said. “I can see the guards in a bad way and remember when Kevin could say,” Let’s go. I have to live here. Let me go. ” “

Now living at home with his family and hoping to regain some of the life robbed at such a young age, the 43-year awakened nightmare for Strickland is finally over.

“I always dreamed, prayed and wanted him to go home,” Roland Strickland said. “It’s finally over. Thank God.”

This story was originally published by Leslie Delas Bour at the Scripps Station. KSHB In Kansas City, Missouri.



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