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LA Covid “Tsunami”: Inside the New Center for America’s Raging Pandemic | Los Angeles

LOs Angels is becoming the center of an uncontrollable coronavirus pandemic in the United States on these last days before the New Year, and authorities say the surge in infectious diseases is one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United States. Warns that it is destroying the medical system.

LA County faces a recent horrific Covid development onslaught, including a surge in deaths, a serious shortage of hospital resources, and fears that doctors will have to make painful choices in ration care. ..

“Do I need to start filming dying people?” Marcia Santini, a nurse at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, said she was hospitalized in her workplace from a brutal Covid-19 infection. He said he was recovering. “People need to understand, there is no place to take care of you. You can’t have this idea that this won’t happen to you. It doesn’t work that way anymore. The virus is widespread. I will. “

Uncontrolled “virus tsunami”

There were severe reminders throughout the LA region that the virus was spreading out of control towards the darkest holiday season that some have endured. The mayor explained to the public during the quarantine after his daughter was infected. The hospital had a triage tent. Residents have been waiting in line for hours for a Covid test at Dodger Stadium. The area recently ordered more body bags.

The outbreak afflicted grocery stores, restaurants, stores, shopping malls, Amazon warehouses, manufacturing plants, government buildings, police and fire departments, prisons and prisons, and movie sets.

The mobile field hospital will be set up on Monday at the UCI Medical Center in Orange, California, near Los Angeles. Photo: Jae C Hong / AP

LA County staff Estimated One in 95 residents is currently infected, and two residents die from Covid every hour. More than 6,000 Covid patients are hospitalized and the intensive care unit (ICU) is full.

Still, the area continues to erase records. According to LA Times data, LA currently reports an average of more than 14,700 cases per day, up 78% from two weeks ago. 700 people are hospitalized every day. The number of hospitalizations per day in October was less than 150. By January, officials say it could have 1,400 admissions daily. Over 9,000 people have died.

Dr. Robert Kim Farley, a medical epidemiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, said, “The wave has led to a viral tsunami here in Los Angeles,” saying that families will not be on vacation. I mentioned it for the first time.

Fear in the hospital: “Too many people die alone”

The LA crisis is similar to the catastrophe that New York endured in the spring. This week, the situation in some hospitals became intolerable and workers were prepared for it to get worse.

“Not only is the number of Covid patients increasing, but people are also waiting longer,” said Yolanda Tominak, a critical care nurse at West Hills Hospital. There, workers recently threatened to strike for staffing concerns. “It’s physically exhausting and mentally exhausting. Morale is very low.”

The ventilator tube was attached to a Covid-19 patient at the Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles last month.
The ventilator tube was attached to a Covid-19 patient at the Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles last month. Photo: Jae C Hong / AP

With a shortage of beds and an increase in staff, hospitals are beginning an unthinkable debate about how to provide ration care when there are too many patients. It can mean poor quality of care and increased mortality for all people facing emergencies.

“We hope we don’t have to make such a decision,” said Dr. Jorge Reino, vice president of population health at Martin Luther King Junior Community Hospital (MLKCH), which has the highest proportion of Covid patients in the county. I am. “All institutions that have been hit hard must have those conversations.”

MLKCH, a 131-bed hospital in South LA’s predominantly black and Latin regions, treats 200 patients, requiring doctors to use tents and waiting rooms to care for patients. Some staff need to work on the front lines outside of their normal position. Reino said on Wednesday. Hospitals have moved from one Covid unit to three units and are now looking for more ventilators. “I’m witnessing a very sick patient being mercilessly overwhelmed,” he said.

Suffering within MLKCH severely reminded inequality of the crisis, Reino said, and said the average age of his Covid patients was in their 40s. “We had a chronic disease epidemic before the pandemic,” he said.

UCLA nurse Santini has been openly advocating for more personal protective equipment since spring. Then the virus came for her. She was hospitalized last week when oxygen levels dropped. She posted a video of her breathing struggle on Facebook and asked people to stay home.

Healthcare professionals are found in the Florentine clinic where coronavirus testing is done.
Healthcare professionals are found in the Florentine clinic where coronavirus testing is done. Photo: Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

In an interview from her slowly recovering home, she said she posted the footage because she didn’t expect to survive. “I had to tell people to wake up.”

Santini, 58, was discharged a day and a half later. “I knew how many people were waiting in the ER. The guilty feeling of occupying the room was far worse than I felt.” She was moved to be treated by her colleagues. And said that experience gave her a new perspective on patients suffering from the absence of a family nearby.

“Who cares for people?”

Julie Skomorovsky, an ICU nurse at the Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center who lost her colleague to Covid in April, said it’s hard to see many people in Los Angeles lazy about the recent surge. Said. I took the social distance seriously and dropped the ball somewhere.

“How many of us need to die for people to take this seriously?” He added. “Who will take care of people if we just keep stopping?”

He and some of his colleagues were recently vaccinated, but it was difficult to be optimistic about the many deaths, Skomorovsky said. “People have collapsed … but after three seconds they have to wipe their tears back there.”

In March, LA and California announced some of the earliest closures in the country. This slowed the spread and prevented the hospital from being overwhelmed. However, authorities rushed back in early summer as the US government failed to provide a second round of stimulus in the midst of mass unemployment. This had devastating consequences for LA.

Most of the economy has resumed, but the economic crisis and many restrictions have continued, causing a surge in Covids for holiday trips and rallies, as well as serious fatigue among the population.

The reaction from local authorities was a misleading partial blockade. Authorities made an emotional petition for people to stay home, but allowed the LA mall to remain open, leading to an infection between packed stores and employees. The county closed all meals, but allowed Hollywood to continue filming.

Katie Ramirez on the left is watching her mother Claudia Campos wipe her daughter Haley's mouth at a test site in Los Angeles this month.
Katie Ramirez on the left is watching her mother Claudia Campos wipe her daughter Haley’s mouth at a test site in Los Angeles this month. Photo: Jae C Hong / AP

The data suggest that the public health message is not working and that essential LA workers are paying for it.

Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, an epidemiologist at the University of California, San Francisco, said: “Ten months after the pandemic, individuals and businesses have been hit financially. This is the driving force for people to stay out.”

The LA’s affordable housing crisis has forced many to live in crowded areas, making the region vulnerable to expansion, Bibin’s Domingo said. According to her research, the early blockade did not protect Latin Americans or those without a high school degree. Probably because they were forced to work.

Barbara Hughes, a 61-year-old cashier at the Food 4Less grocery store, said customers were anxious because they didn’t wear masks properly and couldn’t keep distance, especially during busy holidays. It was. At least 21 of her colleagues, including multiple managers, recently signed with Covid.

“I don’t want to bring the virus back to my family,” said Hughes, who participated in an opposition movement for hazard pay. She wears two pairs of gloves and two masks, but is afraid she may not be able to protect her longer.



LA Covid “Tsunami”: Inside the New Center for America’s Raging Pandemic | Los Angeles

Source link LA Covid “Tsunami”: Inside the New Center for America’s Raging Pandemic | Los Angeles

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