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Lancaster University helps control the epidemic of invasive malaria mosquitoes

Lancaster University is participating in a major research project aimed at controlling the spread of invasive malaria mosquitoes in Sudan and Ethiopia. According to the World Health Organization, there were 228 million malaria cases in 2018.

A four-year, £ 3.5 million project funded by Wellcome Trust will investigate the origin and epidemiological significance of the invasive malaria mosquito Anopheles mosquito in the Horn of Africa.

Over the next four years, Dr. Luigi Sedda of Lancaster Medical College will contribute to the project by sampling, analyzing and mapping the emergence, establishment and dissemination of An. Stephensi to identify mosquito population dynamics and bionomics and signal their control.

This project is timely, as the Anopheles stephensi invasion is in most of the Horn of Africa. This malaria vector is a potent vector for both Plasmodium falciparum and Malaria parasite, the latter being a precedent for malaria control and eradication programs because of the frequent recurrence of malaria in the same individual. It poses no risk. “

Dr. Luigi Seda, Lancaster Medical College

The collaboration “Control of Anopheles mosquitoes emerging in Ethiopia and Sudan- (CEASE)” will bring together experts from the University of Jimma and the Armauer Hansen Institute in Ethiopia. University of Khartoum, Sudan; Belgian Institute of Tropical Medicine; Imperial College London, Lancaster University, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine leading the project.

Professor Martin Donnelly of LSTM, Head of Vector Biology, said:

The collaboration looks like this:

  • Use mosquito sampling, genetic ancestor analysis, and spatial modeling to describe the current distribution and route of introduction of mosquitoes.
  • Use healthcare system data, prospective studies to identify cases of malaria, and mathematical modeling to determine if Anopheles stephensi is associated with an increase in malaria.
  • Identify the social and ecological factors that affect the distribution of Anopheles stephensi, define and try the most appropriate mosquito control strategies.

Lancaster University helps control the epidemic of invasive malaria mosquitoes

Source link Lancaster University helps control the epidemic of invasive malaria mosquitoes

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