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Laughing patterns of human infants match those of another species, study finds – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-09-01 01:13:00 –

Related Video Above: Look at these babies laughing to brighten your day Laughter transcends all languages-and now scientists have some of this spontaneous reaction We know that the laughing patterns of human infants are also universal to primate species.The laughing patterns of human infants match those of apes. It was published in a biology letter on Tuesday. Mr. Klett said it would make a “ha ha ha” sound, start big, and then disappear. The reader of comparison p, Marina Davila-Ross, states that not all species of apes are necessarily similar, only those that are evolutionarily closest to humans, such as chimpanzees and bonobos. Psychology at the University of Portsmouth, England, who was not involved in the study. “Laughter seems to reflect some degree of biological roots,” she said. Cret originally discovered this phenomenon by attending a lecture by the famous primatologist Jan Van. Laugh with your friends. When Van Hoof said the monkey laughed between inhalation and exhalation, Klett’s friend showed a video of her baby laughing as well. To test whether a toddler laughs like a monkey, Klett collected audio clips of humans aged 3 to 18 months and asked listeners what percentage of the laughter was produced by inhalation and exhalation. To evaluate Taka. In contrast, the researchers also included five clips of laughing adults. Results came out after two rounds, each with at least 100 listeners. Adults mainly exhaled and laughed, while inhaling and exhaling. To ensure that the results were accurate, Klett had an expert listener analyze the bite of the sound, and their findings were consistent with those of the novice. The results showed that the more laughter was produced by exhaling, the more people perceived it as positive. Researc confirmed this finding when she conducted another experiment and asked a new group of listeners to evaluate how positively they perceived laughter without being informed of their breathing patterns. The new group also found that the laughter they exhaled was more comfortable. The laughter produced by exhalation tends to be greater and more controlled, Klett said. Older babies in the study produced more laughter than younger babies. This may be because as the baby grows up, “parents are seeing that they are learning their communication function and actively trying to reveal something,” Klett said. Davila Ross said he was surprised to see the airflow associated with laughter change as the baby grew up. ”Seeing if such changes could also be seen in other nonverbal vocalizations of humans. Would actually be very interesting. “She added. In future studies, Klett said she wanted to repeat her experiments with other vocalizations, such as crying. She is currently conducting other laughter experiments, including those containing ora. Ngutans, gorillas, and humans see if they change the sound of laughter in order to mimic the laughter of those around them.

Related video above: Watch these babies laughing to brighten your day

Laughter transcends all languages-and now scientists know that this spontaneous reaction is also universal to some primate species.

According to a study published in Biology Letters on Tuesday, the laughter patterns of human infants are consistent with the laughter patterns of apes.

Research author Mariska Klett, an associate professor of cognitive psychology at Leiden University in the Netherlands, said that human adults laugh primarily during exhalation, while infants and large apes laugh both inhaled and exhaled.

According to Mr. Klett, after the adult first inhales, the sound of “hahahaha” is made at once, starts with a loud sound, and then disappears.

“It’s more difficult to explain the types of apes, but there are alternating ha ha ha,” she added.

Marina Davila Ross, a reader of comparative psychology at the University of Portsmouth in the United Kingdom, said that infant laughter does not always resemble the laughter of all apes, and is evolutionarily closest to humans, such as chimpanzees and bonobos. He said it was just a thing. , Those who were not involved in the study.

“Laughter seems to reflect some degree of biological roots,” she said.

Cret originally discovered this phenomenon while attending a lecture by renowned primatologist Jan Van Hoof with a friend. When Van Hoof said the apes laughed between inhalation and exhalation, Klett’s friend showed a video of her baby laughing as well.

To test whether an infant laughs like an ape, Klett collects audio clips of humans laughing from 3 to 18 months, and tells listeners what percentage of laughter is generated by inhalation and exhalation. I asked you to evaluate it.

As a control, the researchers also included five clips of laughing adults.

Results came out after two rounds, each with at least 100 listeners. People could say that toddlers laughed both inhaled and exhaled, while adults laughed primarily in exhaled breath.

To ensure that the results are accurate, Kret had expert listeners analyze the sound bites and their findings matched those of beginners.

Exhaling laughter is more contagious

Researchers also let listeners evaluate which sounds are the most pleasing and contagious.

The results showed that the more laughter was produced by exhaling, the more people perceived it as positive.

Researchers confirmed this finding when conducting another experiment and asked a new group of listeners to evaluate how positively they perceived laughter without being informed of their breathing patterns. .. The new group also found it more fun to spit out laughter.

According to Mr. Klett, the laughter produced by exhalation tends to be louder and more controllable, making it easier for the baby to say that he is having fun and wants to continue playing.

Older babies made more breathtaking laughter

Older babies who participated in the study made more breathtaking laughter than younger babies.

This may be because as the baby grows up, “the baby learns its communication function and parents see the baby actively trying to reveal something.”

Davila-Ross said he was surprised to see the airflow associated with laughter change as the baby grew up.

“It would be very interesting to see if such changes could be seen in other nonverbal vocalizations of humans,” she added.

In future studies, Klett said he wanted to repeat the experiment with other vocalizations, such as crying.

She is currently conducting other laughter experiments on orangutans, gorillas, and humans to see if she can change her laughter to mimic the laughter of those around her.

Laughing patterns of human infants match those of another species, study finds Source link Laughing patterns of human infants match those of another species, study finds

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