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Louisiana residents of Grand Isle vow to call the island home again after it was hit hard by Ida – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-09-06 01:25:00 –

Grand Isle, Louisiana is a region affected by the hurricane “Aida,” and Barrier Island, off the coast of Louisiana, has been severely damaged and lacks water, gas, and electricity. Residents are not yet allowed to go home forever. Over the weekend, cameras were first allowed to see ground-level destruction of the Grand Isle. The people there know they are on a long way. “Being on the ground is completely different from aerial photography,” said homeowner Lenny Elender Anders. “Looking at what we see as a family, grandchild,” for a homeowner like Anders, the damage is incomprehensible to her family. “It’s just (your) livelihood, your happiness. It’s a place, and it’s almost gone, “said Tom Elender. Santiny agrees. He has been a Grand Isle firefighter for over 20 years and said what happened after Aida was the worst damage he had ever seen. “This is the roof of the other camp. The walls in front of the doors, the trees have fallen, and there’s a long way to go,” he said. Santini said he didn’t know what to expect when he first returned to the Grand Isle. He said the image was harsh, not only for himself, but also for the close community. The damage is widespread and catastrophic. Some structures have disappeared and others have been destroyed. Mayor David Camardel said some damage was seen on all buildings and estimates that about 80% of the island was destroyed. Kamaldel has promised to call the island his hometown again, although the path ahead is uncertain. “I promise I won’t go anywhere as long as I have a grain of sand to plant the American flag,” he said. .. Still, many are aware that the journey has just begun. The situation is so dangerous that Saturday was the last day home and business owners assessed the damage. Local leaders seek patience while fighting for reconstruction. “It’s just an emotion for all of us,” said city councilman Ricky Templet. “We are fighting to protect this paradise every year. It’s a’sportsman’s paradise’and we don’t go anywhere.” And the people here are saving whatever they can, but there are still signs of hope. be.

Grand Isle, Louisiana was the area hit by the hurricane “Aida.”

The island of Barrier, off the coast of Luiziana, has been so devastated that it still lacks water, gas and electricity. Residents are not yet allowed to go home forever.

Over the weekend, cameras were first allowed to see ground-level destruction of the Grand Isle. The people there know they are on a long way.

“Being on the ground is completely different from aerial photography,” said homeowner Renee Ellender Anders. “Look at what we saw as a family, grandchildren”

For a homeowner like Anders, the damage is incomprehensible to her family.

“It’s just (your) livelihood, your happy place, and it’s almost gone,” said Tom Elender.

Clement Santini agrees. He has been a Grand Isle firefighter for over 20 years and said what happened after Aida was the worst damage he had ever seen.

“This is the roof of the other camp. The walls in front of the doors, the trees have fallen, and there’s a long way to go,” he said.

Santiny said he didn’t know what to expect when he first returned to the Grand Isle. He said the image was harsh, not only for himself, but also for the close community.

The damage is widespread and catastrophic. Some structures have disappeared and others have been destroyed. Mayor David Camaldel said all the structures had some damage.

He estimates that about 80% of the island was destroyed. However, although the future path is uncertain, Camardel is one of those who are committed to calling the island home again.

“As long as we have a grain of sand to plant the American flag, we won’t go anywhere, I promise you,” he said.

Still, many are aware that the journey has just begun. The situation is so dangerous that Saturday was the last day home and business owners assessed the damage.

Local leaders seek patience while fighting for reconstruction.

“It’s just an emotion for all of us,” said city councilman Ricky Templet. “We are fighting to protect this paradise every year. It’s a’sportsman’s paradise’and we don’t go anywhere.”

And while the people here are saving whatever they can, there are still signs of hope.

Louisiana residents of Grand Isle vow to call the island home again after it was hit hard by Ida Source link Louisiana residents of Grand Isle vow to call the island home again after it was hit hard by Ida

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