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Martian lakes are really clay, suggests new study with Tucson ties | Local news – Tucson, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona 2021-07-31 22:00:00 –

This study was published in Geophysical Research Letters on July 15th. Its authors include Jack Holt and Stefano Nerozzi of the University of Arizona Institute of Moon and Planetary Sciences and the Faculty of Earth Sciences.

In a written statement, Nerozzi pointed out some obvious problems with the theory of lakes.



Images taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show an ice sheet in the South Pole of Mars. The spacecraft has detected clay near ice, which scientists believe is responsible for radar reflections that were previously interpreted as liquid water.


NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona / JHU


“Observations show that the first reason bright reflectors can’t turn into water is that some of them run from underground to the surface. If so, you should see a fountain that we don’t see. “Nerozzi said. “Not only that, multiple reflectors are stacked on top of each other, some in the middle of the polar cap. If this were water, this would be physically impossible.”

Frozen clay, on the other hand, can explain observations from Mars by “no modifiers or asterisks.”

Smectite is abundant, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, which covers about half of the globe. And they produce bright radar returns. Smith and the company tested similar clays in the lab by freezing them above freezing and measuring the reflections they produced.

“It’s a trifecta. It measures material properties, shows that the material properties can explain the observation, and shows that the material is at the location of the observation,” said Smith, who also belongs to York University in Toronto. Told.

Martian lakes are really clay, suggests new study with Tucson ties | Local news Source link Martian lakes are really clay, suggests new study with Tucson ties | Local news

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