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Maryland Families Oppose Policy That Would Reduce Sentences for Violent Offenders – NBC4 Washington – Washington, District of Columbia

Washington, District of Columbia 2021-06-10 00:31:45 –

A group of family members joined the Maryland Crime Victims Resource Center and opposed the “review” policy of the criminal decision that the Maryland Court of Appeals would consider when meeting Monday morning.

The Court of Appeals proposal would allow criminals convicted before the age of 25 or criminals over the age of 60 to seek commutation from judges. The application can only be made after the person has worked for at least 15 years.

Richard and Dawn Collins were one of the families who opposed the Second Look Policy. Their son, Lieutenant Richard Collins III, was a former Bowie State University student who was killed on the University of Maryland campus a few days before graduating.

Under Second Look’s policy, a 25-year-old who killed Collins is eligible for a commutation in his 40s.

“When it comes to judgments or changes to judgments, we need to consider the voices of the victims,” ​​Collins said.

The couple claimed on Wednesday that attending a commutation trial would again hurt the victims and their families and deny the finality of their case.

Kurt Wolfgang, Executive Director of Maryland Crime Victim Resources, said: Center.

However, some supporters of the proposal, such as Josh Robner, senior advocate associate of the Sentence Project, argued that the victims were not monoliths, but those who supported change.

“When people are prosecuted for crimes, they are states, counties, and they bring prosecutions, not individuals. These are civil proceedings,” Rovner said. “That’s why the victim’s voice is one of the many voices we have to hear in this situation.”

The support of the Second Look method derives from widely accepted scientific evidence that the human brain is not fully developed by the age of 18.

“I think we can agree that everyone has the right to show if they are the same person in their late teens and early twenties,” Rovner said.

According to Rovner, applying for a new judgment does not guarantee that the judge will accept it, and some applications are likely to be rejected.

“It’s up to the judge to understand that one can present himself as more than the worst thing he’s ever done, and that he’s changed from a terrible criminal to a contributor. It’s not up to me, and it’s not about deciding which of the victims of the crime, “Robner said.

Many Maryland lawyers have spoken against this change in rules. Among the groups that support it is the Public Defender Maryland office.

The court can rule as early as next week.

Maryland Families Oppose Policy That Would Reduce Sentences for Violent Offenders – NBC4 Washington Source link Maryland Families Oppose Policy That Would Reduce Sentences for Violent Offenders – NBC4 Washington

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