Santa Ana

Memorable moments from Bob Dole’s life and political career | St. Louis News Headlines – St. Louis, Missouri

St. Louis, Missouri 2021-12-05 14:39:00 –

Washington (AP) — Bob Dole’s Political Career It began being elected to the Kansas State Capitol in 1950 and officially ended about 50 years later, just before the White House. After retirement, Dole continued to work until his 90s for the purpose he had cherished.

Look at some of the moments from political life:

As a college student, Dole was planning to become a doctor. World War II changed the direction of his life. He almost died in an injury he received as a second lieutenant leading the assault on the German army. After three years of surgery and physiotherapy, Dole regained his ability to dress, eat and walk. However, he did not regain use of his right hand and arm, and many of his left hands were numb. Dole returned to college, earned a law degree, and was elected a county lawyer. “The theory was that if I couldn’t use my hands, I could use my head,” he later recalled.

———

Dole was a senator already known for his bitter remarks when President Gerald Ford chose him as his running mate. Dole told viewers of the 1976 Vice Presidential Debate in a “democratic war” that killed or injured 1.6 million Americans in the previous 20th century war (the two World Wars of South Korea and Vietnam). I was shocked by declaring it. “Senator Dole has gained a wealth of reputation as a hatchet man tonight,” replied Minnesota Senator Walter Mondale, an opponent of his Democratic Party.

———

Doll rebounded to Jimmy Carter and Mondale because he lost his ticket. He tightened the thorns and turned more thorns towards him. He once analyzed the 1976 presidential election as follows: And I did — myself. “

———

During his nearly 36 years in Congress, Dole became known as a tough deal maker trusted to make bipartisan compromises. “You have to make difficult choices,” said Doll. He wasn’t saying, “If you vote against all the difficult things and vote for all the easy things, you go out and give a speech about how tough you are.”

———

In May 1996, Senate leader Dole surprised his colleagues by announcing his resignation to concentrate on the presidential election. “I seek presidency without relying on people’s judgment,” he said. “And there’s nowhere else to go except the White House or the house.”

———

As a 73-year-old presidential candidate, Dole faced questions about his age. It didn’t help when he fell off the campaign stage in Chico, California and landed on the soil. Dole sought to shift his focus to questions about the personality of his enemy, President Bill Clinton. “If something happens on the route and you have to leave your kids to Bob Dole or Bill Clinton, I think you’ll leave them to Bob Dole,” Dole told voters. Polls on the question suggested that parents felt they weren’t.

———

Hoping to revive the presidential election, Dole launched a 24-hour marathon of events over the last 96 hours until the 1996 election day. When the reporter asked if the doll brought enough clean clothes, he “stopped at the underwear factory.”

———

Doll chose comedian David Letterman’s show for his first appearance after the election. He unleashed a sharp wit that was mostly hidden during the campaign. Doll, who was invited to cook about Clinton’s weight, accused him of: I tried to beat him. Asked if he would consider accepting the Clinton administration’s post, Dole said, “Well, if he wants to give me his job, I’ll think about it.”

“I can say that my post-political career really started that Friday night. Viewers aren’t the ardent and social security devouring source I’m portrayed in democratic campaign ads. “Because I discovered it,” Dole later wrote.

———

Dole was the driving force behind the construction of the World War II Memorial at the National Mall. In his 2004 dedication, he enthusiastically spoke in front of tens of thousands of veterans in the 80’s and 90’s about “the physical and moral courage to make a hero from a boy in a farm or city.”

———

In 2012, Dole looked frail and used a wheelchair to return to the Senate floor in support of the passage of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The treaty is modeled after the groundbreaking Americans with Disabilities Act that he shepherd in the Senate. The treaty, which was opposed by most Republican senators, failed despite his personal appeal.

———

Two weeks later, Dole returned to the Senate when a mourner passed by the casket of Senator Daniel Inouye, with whom Dole was a friend decades before he recovered from the war injury. Doll, who got up from his wheelchair and walked with help, paid tribute to Inouye’s casket. “I don’t want Danny to see me in a wheelchair,” he explained to a Rollcall reporter.

———

In 2014, at the age of 90, Dole embarked on a series of sentimental tours of his home state at a campaign-style pace three to four times a day. Dole, who lives in Washington, said he would like to thank the people of his hometown for helping them for decades. Alongside the library, courthouse, and senior center, Kansas visited all 105 counties, shook hands, and shared memories.

———

“We’re proving that it’s never too late to join Twitter,” Dole, then 92, tweeted from a new social media account in June 2016. The main challenge from candidate Roger Marshall, who campaigned as a Republican. In August, Marshall won the House’s primary and seats, and four years later the Senate. This is also popular with dolls.

———

In 2016, Dole initially upheld former Florida Governor Jeb Bush for a Republican presidential nomination. He later warmed up to Donald Trump, but not to Texas State Senator Ted Cruz. He told the New York Times in January of that year that Cruz was a “radical” and that his nomination would cause a “catastrophic” Republican loss. He later formally approved Trump.

———

In September 2018, then President Trump awarded Dole the Medal of Honor, one of the highest civilian honors awarded in the United States, in recognition of Dole’s military service and long political career. I signed the law. In many respects, Dole embodies Kansas’ motto, “Ad astra per aspera.”

———

Another doll moment that attracted public attention was a moving moment. On December 4, 2018, Dole made an emotional appearance in the rotunda of the US Capitol in front of another World War II veteran, former President George HW Bush’s casket. When the aide lifted the doll out of the wheelchair, the apparently ill doll slowly stiffened, greeted Bush with his left hand, and shook his chin.Many witnessed it, a moving tribute to his former political rivals.

———

Six weeks after the November 2020 election, Dole told Kansas Citystar, “The election is over,” when Trump still refused to make concessions to Democrat Joe Biden and promoted unfounded allegations of fraudulent elections. “. He describes Trump as follows: “It’s a pretty bitter drug for Trump, but it’s true that he lost it.

———

Dole announced on February 18, 2021 that he had been diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and would begin treatment within a few days. Social media is full of sympathy, prayers, and wishes from the entire political spectrum. Dole said: “There are certainly some hurdles, but we also know that we are joining millions of Americans facing their serious health problems.”

———

Hannah reported from Topeka, Kansas. Former Associated Press writer Connie Cass contributed to this report.



Memorable moments from Bob Dole’s life and political career | St. Louis News Headlines Source link Memorable moments from Bob Dole’s life and political career | St. Louis News Headlines

Back to top button