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Memphis begins work of exhuming remains of early KKK leader, removing them from public park – Tampa, Florida

Tampa, Florida 2021-06-02 08:27:18 –

Work began on Tuesday in Memphis, Tennessee, to move the bodies of Confederate generals and early Ku Klux Klan leaders from a public park that once bears his name.

Construction workers began the process of excavating the bodies of Nathan Bedford Forrest and his wife from the Health Science Park monument on Tuesday.

Forrest’s body is buried under a monumental pedestal that once adorned a statue of a Confederate general on horseback.by Memphis commercial appealThe statue was erected in 1904 in what was then known as Forest Park.

The park was renamed in 2013. According to the forest statue, it was removed from the pedestal in 2017. WMC-TV In Memphis.

by WREG-TV After the Confederate Veterans (SCV) withdrew the proceedings against the city, the removal of Forest’s body began. Instead, the city of Memphis and Shelby County have agreed to allow the organization to own the body of the forest.

The SCV states that the forest will be re-buried on the grounds of the National Southern Museum in Colombia, Tennessee, three hours away. SCV also owns a statue of Forest that once stood on his tomb.

According to the commercial appeal, it will take a couple of weeks to remove the body of the forest. The park will host a Juneteenth celebration later this month to celebrate the liberation of black American slaves.

Forrest served as a Confederate general from 1861 to 1865. After the war, he joined the Ku Klux Klan, which has roots in Tennessee, and was eventually named the first “Grand Wizard” of the Hate Group.

The statue of Forrest remains in the Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville.State History Commission Governed earlier this year Legislators argued that the bust could be legally removed from the building, although further approval had to be provided before that.



Memphis begins work of exhuming remains of early KKK leader, removing them from public park Source link Memphis begins work of exhuming remains of early KKK leader, removing them from public park

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