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Mental Health in a Pandemic – Take it Seriously – Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta, Georgia 2022-05-13 12:30:00 –

The 2020 pandemic highlights the importance of prioritizing mental health, but the number of people walking around without treatment continues to grow.

Over the last few years, the country has faced a crisis that can no longer be ignored. The number of people dealing with mental health continues to grow while advertising campaigns are created and celebrities are at the forefront of discussing this issue.

Depression, self-harm and suicide are on the rise among young people. The 2020 pandemic highlights the importance of prioritizing mental health, but the number of people walking around without treatment continues to grow. At some point, we must recognize that mental health is a serious crisis in our country.

According to Mental Health America, suicidal ideation continues to increase among adults in the United States. The number of young people suffering from depression is increasing. Sadly, the vast majority of adults with mental illness are untreated, with a total of more than 20 million untreated adults in the United States. White young people with depression were more likely to receive mental health treatment, and Asian-American young people were least likely to receive mental health care.

So many people are still recovering from the challenges of Covid-19 and 2020. Personally, the pandemic has hit my mental health. I noticed that I went to work and came back to my empty apartment.

In fact, creative ways to maintain social ties have been implemented, but nonetheless, it was not something that physically made people exist. Anxiety and depression sometimes visited my doorstep, but a great support team was able to overcome them. There were people who talked about life where I felt dead-many people don’t.

It is important to be honest about the mental health crisis. It’s easy to put up a slogan like “Be careful about your mental health”, but what does that mean for mothers who have just given birth and are working on postpartum depression? What does that mean for those who are fighting bipolar depression with bonds and can’t afford to pay $ 40 for a treatment session every two weeks? What does that mean for those who have trust problems and are afraid to confront the traumatic events of the past that they have encountered in their lives?

Last month, a headline news article introduced a series of deaths. Whether they were famous celebrities or neighbors, these deaths were the result of suicide.

Unfortunately, these suicides are getting younger and many attribute them to the rise of social media. Sadly, some of these individuals, after working on mental health issues for quite some time, eventually suicidal ideation and left unanswered questions to their loved ones.

Witnessing a mental health crisis can be disturbing, but the number of cases continues to grow among our families, colleagues, church members, and loved ones.

According to a study released in August 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that more than 40% of adults in the United States address mental health problems and substance use. What is worrisome is that more than 50 percent of adults with mental health concerns are untreated.

The proportion of people experiencing severe mental illness is skyrocketing, but many Americans with mental illness are uninsured. In order to completely cure the mental health crisis, we need to address all the issues that impede complete and overall treatment. We need to make resources accessible to all individuals who need them most.

Sandra Charite is a Haitian-American writer and poet. Her first published book, “Broken Crayons Still Color,” was released in 2016. She is also the author of The Lies I Told Myself: Only Truth CanSet You Free, a non-fiction memoir written to inspire and refresh the mind. ..

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