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Millions Face Peasant Eviction Due to End of CDC Moratorium and Delayed Rent Assistance: NPR

Mehran Mossaddad is a single dad who drives Uber to make a living, but he stopped because he couldn’t leave his daughter alone at home when the pandemic broke out. He is lagging behind in rent and is facing eviction. June 8, 2021

NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon


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NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon

Mehran Mossaddad is a single dad who drives Uber to make a living, but he stopped because he couldn’t leave his daughter alone at home when the pandemic broke out. He is lagging behind in rent and is facing eviction. June 8, 2021

NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon

Mehran Mossaddad scared many of the pandemics and spent the night awake. He is a single dad with a 10-year-old daughter who lives outside Atlanta.

“I have a panic attack that I don’t know what is prepared for us,” he says. “I have to take care of her.”

Mosadad drove Uber to make a living, but when the pandemic broke out, he stopped because he couldn’t leave his daughter alone at home. As a result, he was over $ 15,000 behind in rent and the landlord filed a proceeding against him to evict the peasant farmer.

So when in March, when the federal moratorium on peasant eviction was extended and Congress heard that people had approved nearly $ 50 billion to catch up with rent and avoid peasant eviction, Mosadad said help was on the way. I thought.

“I believe in miracles,” he told NPR at the time. “It’s a relief.”

Now the miracle of Mosadad is evaporating. He applied for federal assistance and was approved. But he and his lawyer say the county in which he lives limits the amount of money he can receive for backrents for only 60% of what everyone rents, up to $ 5,000. I will.

“This is very generous, it really is, but it’s not going to solve our problem,” says Mosadad. “So things look pretty ugly now.”

The problem he encountered is that the government’s efforts to distribute billions of dollars to prevent the eviction of peasants also seem quite ugly. At least in some parts of the country.

7 million people According to the Census Bureau, their rent is still behind. The eviction moratorium from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will expire at the end of the month.

Diane Jenter, chairman of the National Union of Low-income Housing for Nonprofit, said:

Funds to support lessees are flowing from the Treasury to state, city and county governments, according to Jenter.

“There is about 370 An emergency rental assistance program has been opened and is now available online daily. “

“They have a long list of 10-page applications and document requirements that unnecessarily slow down the entire process,” says Jenter. Other programs limit the amount that the lessor can receive. This is a problem that Mehran Mossaddad encountered in the Atlanta area.

“Resources are aimed at helping people like him,” says Jenter.

June 8, 2021-Dunwoody, Georgia-Melan Mosadad and his 10-year-old daughter, Ramana Mosadad.

NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon


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NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon

June 8, 2021-Dunwoody, Georgia-Melan Mosadad and his 10-year-old daughter, Ramana Mosadad.

NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon

The program imposes those restrictions because they are concerned about running out of money. DeKalb County, where Mossaddad lives, has told NPR that it will cap payments “to serve as many families and households as possible.” However, Jenter says many programs are too cautious and should make more money for tenants immediately before moving out.

Other programs seem to work much better.

“They really streamlined the process,” says Stephanie Graves, Houston’s landlord, who owns or manages 1,800 rental units. She installed a computer at her facility’s sales office and encouraged her to visit door-to-door and ask residents for help.

Early on, she says the program was messed up-the portal crashed, the application was lost, and there was a long delay. She says a group of Houston landlords told cities and counties, “If we don’t put this together, we’ll be forced to kick people out.”

According to Graves, 20% of the residents of her property, hundreds of people, were delinquent in rent. Now they are getting help.

“More than half of those people are funded and still in their apartments,” she says. She expects the majority of the rest to be paid for their backrents soon, and she isn’t moving to kick them out.

“The system is working and government funding is helping,” she says. “That’s great, great.”

Other programs are also making changes.

“I have a lot of hope,” says Lindsey Siegel, a lawyer at the Atlanta Legal Assistance Association. She says that if the landlord does not cooperate with the rental assistance program, DeKalb County will not allow the lessor to receive the money to repay the rent.

But the new federation Guidelines I’m telling the program to do that. The county is currently telling NPR that it allows direct payments to lessees, but Siegel says it hasn’t seen it happen yet.

As far as Mehran Mossaddad and his daughter are concerned, he says he’s out of the pandemic and has good days and bad nights.

Some things are getting better. He can drive for Uber and make money again. His daughter was having a hard time at a remote school. She is now back in face-to-face school to meet her friends.

“Now she’s doing great things,” he says. “She went from the bottom of the class to somewhere at the top of the class. She came home with a smile and told me she had won 100 in every subject that day.”

But he says at night he is still awake and worried about being kicked out. He is worried that he will live in the car with his daughter without a place to go. “My greatest fear is to disappoint her,” he says.

Mosadad says they have lived in their apartment for 6 years. He says the real estate manager was kind and understanding to him. However, the eviction of peasants is still imminent, and the CDC order to protect families will expire within three weeks.

Mehran Mossaddad and his daughter are waiting for the landlord to sign a contract with them and ask if they can stay home.

NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon


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NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon

Mehran Mossaddad and his daughter are waiting for the landlord to sign a contract with them and ask if they can stay home.

NPR’s Lynsey Weatherspoon

His lawyer, Lindsey Siegel, says he is proposing to allow the landlord to stay with his family. The landlord receives $ 5,000 from the county program, Mosadad catches up with another $ 5,000 in the coming months, and they call it. She is waiting for a reply.

Meanwhile, Mosadad says he called 40 landlords in case he had to move suddenly. However, he says in his record that in this ongoing eviction case, he told him that they wouldn’t all rent him and his daughter to another place of residence.

Millions Face Peasant Eviction Due to End of CDC Moratorium and Delayed Rent Assistance: NPR

Source link Millions Face Peasant Eviction Due to End of CDC Moratorium and Delayed Rent Assistance: NPR

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