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Minnesota Supreme Court Allows Ballot Questions Regarding Minneapolis Police Changes: NPR

City council member Alondra Kano will talk about Minneapolis police financing in June 2020.

Jerry Holt / Star Tribune via AP


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Jerry Holt / Star Tribune via AP

City council member Alondra Kano will talk about Minneapolis police financing in June 2020.

Jerry Holt / Star Tribune via AP

The Minnesota Supreme Court paved the way for Minneapolis voters to determine the future of police in the city where George Floyd was killed Thursday night. vote..

The state Supreme Court overturned the lower court’s decision dismissing the wording of the ballot approved by the city council. The district judge said the wording did not adequately explain the effect of the amendment to the Charter, which would replace the Minneapolis police station with a new department of public safety that could “include” police officers “as needed.”

However, Judge Laurie Gildea said in a three-page order that the judge concluded that the ballot objection did not meet the “high standards” set by the court in the previous proceedings. She said the court would, after a while, issue a full opinion stating its legal grounds to avoid interfering with the start of the vote.

In the Minneapolis local elections, an early absentee ballot began at 8 am on Friday, putting pressure on the Supreme Court to make a swift ruling. The ballot was already printed when Judge Jamie Anderson of the Hennepin County district opposed the language on Tuesday. It was the second time she broke the wording of the council. Chief Judge Rory Gildea swiftly proceeded with the proceedings on Wednesday.

Both lawyers said in advance that they are hoping for a High Court ruling that the language of the ballot will be the final language, given the midnight. Leaders of the Yes4 Minneapolis campaign in favor of the amendment were pushing for a rally set on Friday afternoon.

The proposal stems from the “Defund the Police” movement, which gained momentum after Floyd’s death last summer caused public appreciation for protests, public unrest, and racial justice. The amendment does not use the term “refund”. However, it will remove the requirement of the city charter that Minneapolis has a minimum personnel level police station. Many details about how the new institution will work are left to the city council and the mayor to decide later.

Yes 4 Minneapolis, which led the initiative, will allow the city to continue police if voters approve the amendment, but the new department is free to take a new approach to public safety that can reduce excessive police on the color community Claim to be able to take.

Opponents of the amendment, including former councilor Don Samuels and his wife Sondra, said the ballot wording was how the new department would be implemented, led, staffed and funded. He said he left an important question that could not be explained to voters.

Yes 4 Minneapolis filed with the Supreme Court, arguing that the Minneapolis Police Department would not automatically disappear if the amendment was passed. The group said the sector would survive under current city ordinances until the city council passed new legislation to establish new institutions, and council could maintain as much power as needed for an orderly transition.

Minnesota Supreme Court Allows Ballot Questions Regarding Minneapolis Police Changes: NPR

Source link Minnesota Supreme Court Allows Ballot Questions Regarding Minneapolis Police Changes: NPR

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