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Nicholas, now tropical storm, dumps rain along Gulf Coast | US & World News – Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri 2021-09-14 07:32:08 –

Houston (AP) — Tropical Cyclone Nicholas hits the Texas coast as a hurricane early Tuesday, raining more than a foot (30.5 centimeters) along the same area hit by Hurricane Harvey in 2017 and getting soaked became Louisiana struck by a storm Life-threatening flash floods can occur throughout the Deep South.

Nicholas landed in the eastern part of the Matagorda Peninsula and was soon downgraded to a tropical cyclone. According to the National Hurricane Center in Miami, about 30 miles (50 km) south-southwest of Houston, Texas, the maximum wind speed was 70 mph (110 kph) as of 4 am on Tuesday. Nicholas was the 14th named storm of the 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

The storm was expected to move northeast at 9 mph (15 kph), with Nicholas’ center slowly moving southeast of Texas on Tuesday and southwest of Louisiana on Wednesday.

According to a preliminary report from the National Meteorological Service, Galveston received nearly 14 inches (35 centimeters) of rain in the storm, but more than 6 inches (15 centimeters) of rain in the flood-prone Houston region. I got off. Nicholas can rain up to 20 inches (51 centimeters) in parts of central and southern Louisiana.

Almost every coastline in Texas was warned of tropical cyclones, including flash floods and possible floods in the city. Texas Governor Greg Abbott said authorities had deployed rescue teams and resources in the Houston area and along the coast.

In Houston, authorities were worried that heavy rains could flood the streets and flood homes. Mayor Sylvester Turner said on Monday that authorities had deployed high-level rescue vehicles throughout the city and built barricades in more than 40 flood-prone locations.

“This city is very resilient. We know what we need to do. We know about preparation,” Turner said with reference to four major ones. Flood event hit the Houston area In recent years, including Catastrophic damage from Harvey..

National Weather Service meteorologist Kent Prochazka told The Associated Press earlier Tuesday that the Nicholas wind had knocked down trees in the coastal county and several gas stations had lost their shades.

“Immediately before landing, I was hit by a sudden hurricane, and as I moved inland, the pressure began to rise. The wind was slightly relaxed and I am now in a tropical cyclone (wind),” he says. I did.

CenterPoint Energy reported that more than 300,000 customers are expected to lose power and increase in number as the storm passes through Houston.

Many school districts along the Gulf Coast canceled classes on Monday due to a storm. The state’s largest Houston school district and other school districts have announced that classes will be canceled on Tuesday. The weather threat also closed multiple COVID-19 testing and vaccination sites in the Houston and Corpus Christi areas, forcing the cancellation of the Harry Styles concert scheduled for Monday night in Houston.

Rain of 6 to 12 inches (15 to 30 centimeters) was expected along the coasts of central and upper Texas, and could be up to 18 inches (46 centimeters) of isolation. In southeastern Texas, south-central Louisiana, and other parts of southern Mississippi, you may see 4 to 8 inches (10 to 20 centimeters) in the next few days.

Tornadoes can occur along the coasts of northern Texas and southwestern Louisiana on Tuesday, according to the Meteorological Department.

At a press conference in Houston, Abbott said, “If you listen to local weather alerts and pay attention to local recommendations for correct and safe action, you can survive this storm like many other storms. I will. “

Nicholas brought rain to the same area of ​​Texas that was hit hard by Harvey. The storm landed on the coast of central Texas, then stagnated for four days, causing more than 60 inches (152 cm) of rain in parts of southeastern Texas. Harvey was blamed for at least 68 deaths, including 36 in the Houston area.

After Harvey, voters approved the issuance of $ 2.5 billion in bonds to fund flood control projects, including the expansion of Bayeux. Designed to mitigate future storm damage, 181 projects are in various stages of completion.

But Brian McNordi, a hurricane researcher at the University of Miami, said Nicholas expects to be “smaller than Harvey in every way.”

Nicholas’s concern is how slowly it moves. The storm has been moving slowly in recent decades, and Nicholas could get stuck between two other meteorological systems, said Jim Kossin, a climate services hurricane researcher.

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards declared an emergency on Sunday night before the storm arrived in the state Still recovering from Hurricane Aida When Last year’s hurricane roller And a historic flood.

“The most serious threat to Louisiana lies in the southwestern part of the state, where recovery from hurricane rollers and the May floods is underway,” Edwards said.

The storm was expected to bring the heaviest rainfall to the west than anywhere else Ida crashed into Louisiana 2 weeks ago. Ida has been accused of killing 86 people nationwide. Approximately 95,000 customers remained out of power on Tuesday morning throughout Louisiana, according to a utility tracking site. poweroutage.us..

Colorado State University hurricane researcher Phil Klotzbach said that between 1966 and September 12, there were only 14 or more named storms in 2005, 2011, 2012, and 2020 via Twitter. Said it was four years.

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The Associated Press writer Jill Breed in Little Rock, Arkansas, Julie Walker in New York, and AP Science writer Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.

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Follow Juan A. Lozano on Twitter. https://twitter.com/juanlozano70

Copyright 2021 AP communication. all rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.



Nicholas, now tropical storm, dumps rain along Gulf Coast | US & World News Source link Nicholas, now tropical storm, dumps rain along Gulf Coast | US & World News

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