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NY restaurant fires waitress unable to get Covid-19 vaccine

After nearly a year of destroying New York City’s restaurant industry, shutting down thousands of businesses altogether, and sacrificing jobs for tens of thousands of people, we’re optimistic this month.

Limited indoor meals have resumed, and restaurant workers such as servers, cooks, and deliverers have joined the list of New Yorkers who can be vaccinated with the Covid-19 vaccine.

But at a restaurant in Brooklyn, she said the change caused a clash between the owner and a waitress who was fired on Monday. He resisted vaccination, fearing that doing so could reduce his chances of becoming pregnant.

Over the weekend, restaurant Red Hook Tavern demanded that employees be vaccinated, and then waitress Bonnie Jacobson asked for time to study the potential effects of the vaccine on fertility. Finished.

“I fully support the vaccine,” Jacobson, 34, said in an interview Wednesday. She added: “If this isn’t one, I’ll probably get it.”

The restaurant owner did not specifically comment on Jacobson’s case, but he said the business policy was revised to clarify to employees how to seek vaccination exemptions.

Jacobson’s experience comes from the restaurant industry struggling to overcome the big pandemic sacrifices, where the future is critical to New York’s recovery.

This controversy is a challenge faced by employers across the United States as they seek ways to ensure vaccination, such as requiring workers to be vaccinated or providing incentives to do so. Is highlighted.

In New York, restaurant employees are one of the first workers to be vaccinated outside the healthcare industry. For restaurants, vaccination of workers is seen as important not only as a way to protect their health, but also to bring back spooky customers. Elsewhere, some California restaurant workers may be vaccinated in the next phase later this month.

Developed by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, the vaccine currently distributed has not been tested in pregnant women, but has not shown any adverse effects or been manufactured in animal studies. Evidence that they affect fertility.. last month, who Pregnant women were advised not to “use” the vaccine unless they were at high risk due to their underlying health condition or potential exposure to the coronavirus.

Billy Durney, owner of Red Hook Tavern, didn’t answer the question about Jacobson, but the issue could have been dealt with differently and the restaurant employee guidelines for requesting an exemption were immediate. Suggested that it was changed to.

“After New York allowed restaurant workers to get the Covid-19 vaccine, I thought this was a great opportunity to plan to keep our team and guests safe,” said Durney. Said in the email.

“No one has ever faced these challenges and we have made the decision that we believe will best protect everyone,” he added. “And now we realize that we need to update our policies so that the team can see how the processes work and what they can do to support them. “

The vaccine first became available in December, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a federal agency that enforces workplace discrimination legislation, issued guidelines such as: Companies may require Workers to be vaccinated.Still, the committee said, employers Had to provide “Reasonable accommodation” for persons with disabilities.

However, in an interview, the hiring lawyer said the case in Brooklyn was probably the first publicly known case of a person who was unemployed due to vaccination.

“Employers, on the one hand, have a duty to protect their employees and customers, and the virus is in a difficult position because it is a very clear and dangerous illness and often has fatal consequences,” says Lorie E. Almon. Mr. says. Employment and labor lawyers At the company Seyfarth Shaw. “On the other hand, workers are, of course, concerned about this type of new vaccination.”

“This is a problem that occurs many times as vaccines become more widely available,” Almon added.

Carolyn D. Richmond, a labor law lawyer who advises the NYC Hospitality Alliance, the city’s leading industry group for restaurants and bars, said the vaccine is still premature and difficult to inject, so companies are He said it was too early to determine the requirements. ..

“Pregnancy and vaccines — as soon as you hear those words at work, you should stop thinking about what you’re doing right or wrong,” she said. “Generally it needs to be available to employees, but it’s not. None of us have an easy time to get a promise.”

Over the past year, Jacobson’s personal story has reflected many New Yorker stories. She entered 2020 for reasons of hope: plans to start trying new jobs and having her husband and children.

However, a pandemic wrapped around the city and she lost her job in April. In Wing, a social club and coworking space for women with a branch in New York And other cities. In August she found a job as a waitress at Red hook tavern..

Most weeks, Jacobson worked part-time and took the shifts available when the restaurant served outside customers. Some days were busier than others, such as the 13-hour shift on Sunday on Valentine’s Day.

In the hustle and bustle of Sunday, she felt the phone vibrate with a message from the restaurant owner. She didn’t read until late that night. It said it was imperative to get vaccinated.

Jacobson responded Monday morning, reiterating her desire to learn more about the potential effects of the vaccine on fertility. The management reaction she provided to the reporter was brief. “At this point your employment is over. I’m sad to see you go. If you change your mind, feel free to let me know.”

On Wednesday, Jacobson was eager to distract what had happened. She spent the day having lunch outdoors with her husband and visited the Brooklyn Museum.

“The restaurant industry, it takes a lot from you and doesn’t return a lot,” she said. “It really brought it to the surface for me.”

NY restaurant fires waitress unable to get Covid-19 vaccine

Source link NY restaurant fires waitress unable to get Covid-19 vaccine

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