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Ohio doctor and noted anti-vaxxer makes false magnetism, 5G claims to lawmakers – Wichita, Kansas

Wichita, Kansas 2021-06-08 18:46:19 –

Columbus, OhioWCMH) – Cleveland doctors and anti-vaccine supporters have spit out false rants about 5G internet and metal objects sticking to the bodies of vaccinated people. Testify at Ohio House Health Commission Meeting Tuesday.

Dr. Sherri Tenpenny, an osteopath, House building 248 Which one Prevent businesses and governments from demanding vaccinations. Osteopathic doctor “Whole body approach” Rooted in The principle that the body can heal itself..

In her testimony, Tempenny said:

“I think you’ve seen pictures of people who took these shots on the internet, but now they’re magnetic. You can lock your forehead. They stick. They’re spoons or Forks can be placed on top of them and they can stick together, because we now think that there is a piece of metal in it.

“Some people have long suspected that there may be some kind of interface, an” undefined “interface between what is injected into these shots and all 5G towers. “

The COVID-19 vaccine does not contain metals or microchips that make the recipient magnetic at the injection site, physics, or medical professional. Told Reuters..

There is no evidence that 5G harms the immune system Martil Simco, Science Director, SciProof International, Sweden I told the Associated Press last year.

Disinformation experts told the magazine that the theory gained momentum from the Russian state media in 2019 and helped break into conversations in the United States. AP report.

Poynter Institute PolitiFact Fact Check Sheet Tempenny’s on Tenpenny showed that she was lying in 100% of the videos she reviewed, saying, “I used to say that vaccines are the cause of autism, but public health officials have denied that claim. did.

Tempenny’s testimony arrives the day after the Ohio Department of Health. We hosted a conference to dispel the myths about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Ohio doctor and noted anti-vaxxer makes false magnetism, 5G claims to lawmakers Source link Ohio doctor and noted anti-vaxxer makes false magnetism, 5G claims to lawmakers

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